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Subversion svn checkout vs. update


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#1 TobyD

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Posted 16 May 2009 - 06:47 PM

In the little bit of testing that I have done, it seems that when svn checkout is run on a pre-existing working copy it acts just like svn update. I can't find any "official" reference to this in the manual or googling.

Can anyone confirm or dispute this claim? The only difference I see is that svn checkout requires an explicit URL?

I am in a situation where I would like TestStand to pull the latest files from a subversion repository before each test begins. If calling svn checkout will not cause any problems then it greatly reduces the code I have to write. I can do one simple "checkout" which will either checkout or update depending on the state of the build tree (I don't have to try to figure out if a working copy already exists).

Thanks,

Toby



Toby Dayley

#2 asbo

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    I have no idea what you're talking about... so:

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Posted 16 May 2009 - 07:17 PM

I tested by checking out a repository one revision back, then checking out again with the same target and no revision specified - it was, in fact, smart enough to update the working copy instead of re-checking out everything.



#3 TobyD

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 05:09 PM

QUOTE (asbo @ May 15 2009, 10:56 AM)

I tested by checking out a repository one revision back, then checking out again with the same target and no revision specified - it was, in fact, smart enough to update the working copy instead of re-checking out everything.


Thanks. That's what my testing showed too, so I guess I'll go with the checkout command to simplify my code unless I hear about or discover a good reason not to do it that way.


Toby Dayley