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LV 2014 released

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I was looking for 2013 SP1 and the google link took me to the "latest release" page which looks like it's just been updated with 2014.

 

Looking through the release notes and the only great! feature I saw was the Reviewing and Updating Type Definition Instances.  This one always frustrated me to no end.  Now, it makes efforts to map automatically update default typedefs and if it can't decide how to do it, it puts the instance in an "unresolved" state and prompts you to manually update it.

 

I really didn't see anything else of much note.  Probably the lightest new feature bump I can ever recall...

 

Mike

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Downloading now, I'd like to play with it a bit before NI gets a chance to tell me how great it is.

 

32-bit

64-bit

 

I sorta agree, not much that excites me, but last year had some good stuff.

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Okay just finished installing and a few things stick out.

 

The Full and Professional include PID and Fuzzy Logic, and the Professional now includes, Database Connectivity, Desktop Execution, Report Generation, Unit Test, and the VI Analyzer.  Doesn't this make the Developer Suite appear less attractive because compared to last year there are less things between a Professional and a Developer Suite?  Does this mean NI will be lowering the price of the Developer Suite?

 

It also has a section talking about Automated Test Suite, Embedded Control and Monitoring Suite, and the HIL and Real-Time Test Suite but the link is broken at the moment.  It is listed at the moment as http://www.ni.com/labview/suites

 

The Clear Errors which allows to specify an error code only accepts a scalar and not an array of errors to clear.  The OpenG versions have existed since version 6.x or so and supports scalar or array as a polymorphic VI.

 

I'm curious to see how the TDMS Set Properties NI_MinimumBufferSize affects performance, and file size when used right.

 

One could argue that the High Resolution Relative Seconds is an idea exchange item and should be mentioned.  Also the Hidden Gems mentioned in that idea exchange puts it on the palette among other goodies for other versions of LabVIEW.

 

The Replace with Case Selector feature is nice.  You select an input tunnel and it basically wires the case selector tunnel through it.  That means this works for any datatype including error, string, enum, etc.

 

Is Path and Not Empty is nice.  I've made my own over the years but still nice to see it native.

 

Custom documentation is nice for things like linking to PDFs.  Same goes for linking to PDFs in the help menu.  I've been able to do this just by having a VI in the help menu that opens the PDF.

 

Application Builder now can make a folder with the version of the build which is super nice.  But I've been doing this with Post-Build VIs.

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How could that exhaustive list not include the top new feature...The new icon!   :wacko:

 

The 64-bit Mac version clearly took most of the developer free energy this release cycle.  That segment of the population should be very happy, of course they are also embarking on a de facto beta period.  New releases are a bit risky, new releases on a new platform are risky squared.

 

My real fear is that the meteorological conditions next week could be right for a Stignado if the cold air from the Austin convention center mixes with hot smoke being blown up my backside by a Blue-team member describing the "awesome new features that will revolutionize my LV development".   They simply aren't there.  I am perfectly happy hearing why they aren't there (limited resources, budgets, etc.) and why I should expect them in the next few releases (laying groundwork, etc.), it just seems like the default discussion is "no really, they are there, aren't they great?".

 

If I were a new user then there would be no reason not to move to LV14.  Likewise, if I was looking to move to the Mac or Linux platform, LV14 is a most welcome development.  As for a Windoze user considering an upgrade, I did not see much there to make it worth the pain.  

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How could that exhaustive list not include the top new feature...The new icon!   :wacko:

 

Yeah well first of all the new icon is fine.  Too bad it doesn't patch all the other 20+ years of LabVIEW releases that maybe installed to change their icons.  And also others have been able to edit the file with a resource hacker program to replace the icon seen.  And the third reason the new icon doesn't make me jump for joy...this...

 

post-6627-0-87364500-1406923245_thumb.pn

 

Can you tell me with absolute certainty that my version in the bottom row on the right is 2014?  I'm not complaining saying the icon should be bigger, there are real limitations on the icon size.  But for me this feature isn't very useful.

 

I agree that not every version of LabVIEW will have killer new features like the project explorer, classes, or scripting.  I did plan on going to the "What's New" session so we'll see what is said about the new feature list.  Here's hoping Darren slipped in another super secret key like "QuickItalics".  I never realized how much I use quick bold and I didn't see any of that in release notes or talked about before his presentation.

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My link dropped out of the last post.  The icon at #1 was a joke, one day my LV Getting Started Window pointed me here to check out the "The Top 3 new features of LV2014".  Since renamed to "3 new features..." but notice the URL.

 

https://decibel.ni.com/content/blogs/labview-news-english/2014/07/11/sneak-preview-the-top-3-new-features-of-labview-2014#/

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I wouldn't mind a "stability and performance" release.  Hopefully there was a lot of work behind the scenes to improve the IDE and fix bugs...

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Likewise, if I was looking to move to the Mac or Linux platform, LV14 is a most welcome development.  As for a Windoze user considering an upgrade, I did not see much there to make it worth the pain.  

 

I think that's a bit harsh. Mac and Linux 64 bit support is probably the biggest change in LV since 2009. I would agree with you (and have often stated similar) with releases from 2009-2013, and might even go so far as to say 2009-2013 it has only really been cosmetic changes but 64 bit platform support across the board is a phenomenal step forward that would have required a huge investment in time and skills.

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I think that's a bit harsh. Mac and Linux 64 bit support is probably the biggest change in LV since 2009. I would agree with you (and have often stated similar) with releases from 2009-2013, and might even go so far as to say 2009-2013 it has only really been cosmetic changes but 64 bit platform support across the board is a phenomenal step forward that would have required a huge investment in time and skills.

 

What part was too harsh?  That if I were using Mac/Linux I would certainly welcome 64-bit versions (and that it clearly took most of the development time) or that I found very little difference between LV13 and LV14 on my Windoze machine.  I have stated elsewhere on multiple occasions that I think the 64-bit versions are the big story of LV14 yet the marketing so far has still been trumpeting new features like the icon.

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What part was too harsh?  That if I were using Mac/Linux I would certainly welcome 64-bit versions (and that it clearly took most of the development time) or that I found very little difference between LV13 and LV14 on my Windoze machine.  I have stated elsewhere on multiple occasions that I think the 64-bit versions are the big story of LV14 yet the marketing so far has still been trumpeting new features like the icon.

 

I assume those statements were under the beta forums?

 

I was just saying that trivialising the support for 64 bit was a bit harsh just because it is of no use to you in windows where we have had it for yonks. If you have ever worked with large datasets (grandma egg sucking I expect), you will be aware of the importance of 64 bit and now NI have spent the considerable energy to port to the other 64 bit platforms which were the withered limbs of the LabVIEW platform support.

 

Personally, nothing, IDE or feature-wise, has convinced me of moving from 2009 in all the versions let alone 2014 so It's no change there for me. Even though I produce tools in later versions, they are still developed in 2009 (64 bit, at that) and just packaged in later versions due to 3rd party support requirements. I think, however, a huge amount of kudos should go to NI for expanding the 64 bit platforms and making LV a truly x-platform solution even if the best thing to crow about under windows is a new icon.

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As someone who has applications that demand 64-bit architecture, I'm glad to see it adopted beyond Windows even if I'm platform locked for the time being. I can only hope support for these platforms becomes more mainstream.


Also, this:

 

Reviewing and Updating Type Definition Instances

 

In LabVIEW 2013 and earlier, when you apply changes from a type definition to instances of that type definition, LabVIEW may lose or incorrectly preserve the default values for the instances you want to update.

 

In most cases, LabVIEW 2014 automatically preserves the default values of each instance you update from a type definition. When an instance cannot be automatically updated, LabVIEW places the instance in an unresolved state until you manually update using the Review and Update from Type Def. dialog box.

 

You can view the Review and Update from Type Def. dialog box by right-clicking an unresolved instance and selecting Review and Update from Type Def. The Review and Update from Type Def shortcut menu item replaces the Update from Type Def shortcut menu item that appears in LabVIEW 2013 and earlier.

 

That was one of the worst and longest lived bugs in LabVIEW that caused me no end to grief. I won't be able to upgrade for a bit, but this single issue alone makes me think it will be a great patch release as far as code maintenance goes.

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That was one of the worst and longest lived bugs in LabVIEW that caused me no end to grief. I won't be able to upgrade for a bit, but this single issue alone makes me think it will be a great patch release as far as code maintenance goes.

 

It's an interesting solution to a problem I have never seen. Whilst I would agree it's better than introducing arbitrary bugs, I just wonder how effective it will be when SCC is used as you may end up with it just as big a pain as the merge tool and phantom recompiles.

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Another improvement to mention is packed project library support...

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Is there any SSH love added to 2014? The Internet Toolkit went unsupported last year and it's been 4 years of waiting for native SSH.

 

Something I can actually use would be far better than a new icon or bundling the Report Generation Toolkit ( that my boss just purchased two weeks ago and is now part of Pro; thanks sales rep; we'll have to remember that when SSP renewal comes around ).

Edited by Phillip Brooks
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When I got labSSH a year or so ago, it didn't have 64-bit support.  I can't tell from the blurb if that has changed any.

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So I was asking Darren at the BBQ if there was any other new features in 2014 that maybe were less known, or not talked about.  The example I gave was the QuickBold in 2013.

 

The feature he mentioned was an update to the quick drop remove key to have slightly different behavior in 2014.  In 2013 if you do quick drop, then CTRL + Shift + R on a build array function it will remove terminals not wired.  Both on the top, the middle, or the bottom.  This also works with a few other functions like merge error, and I think some cluster functions.

 

Well along those same lines Darren said the CTRL + Shift + R on a case structure will now perform the same operation as the Right click, Remove Case Structure.  Nothing major, and probably not note worthy but I like to know about these obscure features.

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Browsing for updates just revealed this:

post-17453-0-01369500-1408119213_thumb.p

 

See you guys in a couple of month :lol:

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Labview2012 versus 2014:

2012:

symbio goop development suite installed.

Large application (>5000 vi's) using database, office GOOP3 classes, Symbio GOOP4 classes, DAQmx, VISA, ..

Building an executable is working, but after the build Labview2012 has to be closed (or next builds will crash).

On close Labview2012 crashes and send a report to NI.

 

2014:

ni goop development suite installed.

All vi's of the above project recompile without any problem.

No restart of Labview2014 needed  :thumbup1:

 

I also recompiled all my other projects and until now no problems.

 

Also building an executable is a bit faster in 2014 then in 2012.

 

NI keep up the good work!!

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Building an executable is working, but after the build Labview2012 has to be closed (or next builds will crash).

On close Labview2012 crashes and send a report to NI.

I have seen that issue many times all on 2012, or 2012 SP1.  I believe they fixed that in 2013 not just 2014.  I still have some programs made in 2012 and I dread making changes just because I know it will take several restarts of LabVIEW to get my EXE built again.  Usually I say not to upgrade to a new version of LabVIEW mid project due to the unknown risk, but for me I think the risk is worth being able to make EXEs easier again. 

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Another improvement to mention is packed project library support...

 

What are the improvements on this???

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Ok ladies. I did a VI Shots episode where I went through and mentioned some of the new features in LabVIEW 2014. Feel free to watch it at your leisure. However, during the show, I tried to demo the Reviewing and Updating Type Definition Instances dialog and it was a complete failure. Here is a link to jump directly to the demo. watch and cry as i repeatedly bang my head against the LabVIEW wall of shame.

 

I made sure that before the show I tried out the demo and it worked as advertized. However, it didn't work live. I consider myself a smart guy but my wife claims otherwise. Am I just misunderstanding the feature? Can you take a look and point out what I did wrong?

 

I just tried this again with various scenarios using front panel controls, constants with various datatypes but have not been able to trigger the resolve conflict dialog. Can someone translate NI's unhelpful documentation?

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What are the improvements on this???

 

From http://zone.ni.com/reference/en-XX/help/371361L-01/lvupgrade/labview_features/

 

Improvements to Loading Packed Project Libraries and Shared Libraries with the Same Library Version

To simplify the task of loading shared libraries from VIs or packed project libraries that share the same version, LabVIEW 2014 suppresses the Load Warning Summary dialog box that earlier versions of LabVIEW launch when you cross-link shared libraries or packed project libraries. Cross-linking occurs when you load a shared library from a VI or packed project library and then load another shared library with the same name from another VI or packed project library in a different location while the first library is still in memory. When loading the second shared library, LabVIEW links to the location of the first shared library. Shared libraries or packed project libraries must have the same version number to be the same version.

Excluding Dependent Packed Project and Shared Libraries from a Build Specification

In LabVIEW 2014, you can reduce the number of files LabVIEW copies when you create multiple build outputs that include the same libraries. You can specify to exclude dependent packed libraries and shared libraries from a build specification, and LabVIEW retains relative links to the source location of the excluded files. Otherwise, LabVIEW duplicates the packed project libraries and shared libraries in each subsequent output. To exclude these libraries, enable Exclude dependent packed libraries and Exclude dependent shared libraries on the Additional Exclusions page of the Properties dialog box for the build specification.

Setting the Destinations of Packed Project and Shared Libraries You Include with a Build Specification

In LabVIEW 2014, you can specify the destinations of dependent packed project libraries and shared libraries included as part of a build specification configuration. To specify the destinations of dependent files, select Dependencies on the Source Files Settings page of a build specification. Enable Set destination for all contained items and Set destination for packed and shared libraries, and select destinations from the drop-down menu.

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