Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ayumisano

Installation of LabVIEW in Linux

Recommended Posts

Dear all,

I have got a disc of LabVIEW which could be installed in Windows, I wonder if I can also install LabVIEW with the same disc in Linux. If yes, can I just install it in Linux by just putting the disc into the CD-rom? Sorry for my ignorance, I am not that familiar with Linux. Thank you for your attention~

Ayumi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have got a disc of LabVIEW which could be installed in Windows, I wonder if I can also install LabVIEW with the same disc in Linux. If yes, can I just install it in Linux by just putting the disc into the CD-rom? Sorry for my ignorance, I am not that familiar with Linux. Thank you for your attention~

5940[/snapback]

No, the Linux and Windows versions are very different. You'd need to buy the Linux edition separately or contact NI directly about it.

NI Linux page

Installation under Linux is straightforward enough (run one of the programs on the CD).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No, the Linux and Windows versions are very different. You'd need to buy the Linux edition separately or contact NI directly about it.

NI Linux page

Installation under Linux is straightforward enough (run one of the programs on the CD).

5941[/snapback]

Thank you for your reply! :)

I would also like to know whether the funtions available in LabVIEW for Windows will also be available in that for Linux. (Since I have finished writing some vi with LabVIEW in Windows, I understand that the vi written in Windows cannot be used in Linux, but at least I hope that I can use those vi written in Windows as the blueprint and modify not too much if I want to have the same function in Linux)

Thank you for your attention~

Ayumi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for your reply!  :)

I would also like to know whether the funtions available in LabVIEW for Windows will also be available in that for Linux. (Since I have finished writing some vi with LabVIEW in Windows, I understand that the vi written in Windows cannot be used in Linux, but at least I hope that I can use those vi written in Windows as the blueprint and modify not too much if I want to have the same function in Linux)

Thank you for your attention~

Ayumi

5947[/snapback]

You can use the VIs you wrote in windows, but if they call windows specific code (DLLs, registry VIs, ActiveX), that code won't work. All the code that is pure G should work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just started to play with 7.0 for Linux.

The only problem I've had so far is the Example Finder doesn't seem to have any examples in it (But they're easy enough to find manually) and Firefox occasionally crashes when I'm viewing Help pages. A Search causes a crash every time.

Today I made a very simple .exe in Linux and tried running it on a Windows box. A command window came up with an error and the program would not run. That was only my first try though.

I have also opened VIs in Linux that were written in Windows. A few things that wouldn't cross over. But I think that was due more to version conflict. (7.0 Linux vs 7.1 Windows)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Today I made a very simple .exe in Linux and tried running it on a Windows box.  A command window came up with an error and the program would not run.  That was only my first try though.

5955[/snapback]

I may be wrong, but my understanding is that you can only run a LabVIEW EXE on the platform for which it was built on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I may be wrong, but my understanding is that you can only run a LabVIEW EXE on the platform for which it was built on.

5960[/snapback]

Yes, you can only run an EXE on the platform it was built in, and I remember seeing a fairly detailed explanation from Rolf somewhere on exactly why this is so.

An OS emulator (like wine) would probably work if you don't use hardware, but I don't know how fast or reliable it would be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You can use the VIs you wrote in windows, but if they call windows specific code (DLLs, registry VIs, ActiveX), that code won't work. All the code that is pure G should work.

5949[/snapback]

Oh!! That means I cannnot use .DLLs that were written in Windows?? What can I do?? I used C++ to write and made a .dll (I spent a lot of time on it :( ) Is there any way that I can use these codes in Linux (so that I will not waste my effort)? I am sorry for being not familiar with Linux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, you can only run an EXE on the platform it was built in, and I remember seeing a fairly detailed explanation from Rolf somewhere on exactly why this is so.

An OS emulator (like wine) would probably work if you don't use hardware, but I don't know how fast or reliable it would be.

5963[/snapback]

It's ok that I can build the vi again in Linux, but I just want to make sure that the functions which are available in Windows LabVIEW are also available in Linux LabVIEW. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's ok that I can build the vi again in Linux, but I just want to make sure that the functions which are available in Windows LabVIEW are also available in Linux LabVIEW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't use Linux (or LV for Linux, for that matter), so I can't give you an answer based on experience, but basically, all the functionality that is available in LV for windows should be available in the Mac and Linux versions as well. There may be some exceptions, but the basics should all be there.

As for your c++ code, Linux has c++ compilers and shared libraries as well, so you should be able to recompile your code in a linux c++ compiler (you may need to make some modifications). I think there is one called G++. Anyway, after you compile it into a linux shared library, you just call it as you would a DLL. That's the basic idea, anyway.

You should try reading the rest of the posts in this board and search NIs site for "linux" to see what kind of problems people ran into.

5983[/snapback]

Thank you for your reply! ^^

Linux doesn't use .dll, right?? So what should I do to make a library in Linux?

I am reading the articles from LabVIEW bookshelf about calling external code. It seems that only C source code can be used in Linux. Can C++ source code also be used in Linux?? (It would be a disaster for me to write the code again in C since I am not familiar with C)

Ayumi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

C++ is just another dialect of C sometimes worse to read but essentially the same.

The only problem for LabVIEW is the name mangling used is C++++ function calls to make overloading of names by the programmer possible.

Export your externally needed functions in c-style and you can call from LabVIEW.

But.. in fact the advise from Michael (writing in LabVIEw) is an even better response.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi

C++ is just another dialect of C sometimes worse to read but essentially the same.

The only problem for LabVIEW is the name mangling used is C++++ function calls to make overloading of names by the programmer possible.

Export your externally needed functions in c-style and you can call from LabVIEW.

But.. in fact the advise from Michael (writing in LabVIEw) is an even better response.

6001[/snapback]

Standard Linux distributions come with the GNU compiler, which can handle C, C++, Java and a few other options as well. Usually something like:

g++ -Wall -olibrary.o -c library.cpp

will create an object file from a C++ source file.

C is a "subset" of C++, much of the basic syntax is similar however C has no support for classes, overloading or the OO side of the code, so rewriting good C++ code in C is usually very timeconsuming, and in this case, there's no need.

Make sure any functions that need to be called from LabView are exported with:

extern "C" {...function prototypes...}

and you should then be able to use CINs to access C++ functions. The guide in the Labview bookshelf has more details on compiling - where it talks about C, C++ works just as well.

As a last resort, you could consider copying and pasting the code into a formula node...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.