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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/19/2019 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    So I wasn't there but there was a public announcement at GDevCon about a new edition of LabVIEW called Community Edition which is the LabVIEW Professional version (I read that as application builder included), and completely free with no watermarks for non-commercial use. NI hasn't made any post about timelines, or other details yet but I hear those are in the works. This is obviously a huge thing for LabVIEW as any monetary barrier to entry will discourage new developers from experimenting with LabVIEW. And then there is the fact that those that are familiar with LabVIEW, can keep up with the newest version outside of their company, or when they are between jobs.
  2. 1 point
    I noticed on sourceforge that there is a version 4.2 of OpenG Zip. Will it be released as a package anytime soon?
  3. 1 point
    The programming term you should look into is Futures and Promises. It is about handling results not yet received (such as defining their order, as you wish to do). Single-element Queues, as TomOrr0W suggests, is what I usually use.
  4. 1 point
    I don't know of any ready-built solutions, but I did come up with the idea below when you mentioned not wanting to reorder (there may be a way to do this with channel wires, but I am not really familiar with that feature) (vi is also attached, saved to LV2018): Parallel Processing Order.vi
  5. 1 point
    I threw this together, and maybe someone will find it useful. I needed to be able to interact with cmd.exe a bit more than the native system exec.vi primitive offers. I used .NET to get the job done. Some notable capabilities: - User can see standard output and standard error in real-time - User can write a command to standard input - User can query if the process has completed - User can abort the process by sending a ctrl-C command Aborting the process was the trickiest part. I found a solution at the following article: http://stanislavs.org/stopping-command-line-applications-programatically-with-ctrl-c-events-from-net/#comment-2880 The ping demo illustrates this capability. In order to abort ping.exe from the command-line, the user needs to send a ctrl-c command. We achieve this by invoking KERNEL32 to attach a console to the process ID and then sending a ctrl-C command to the process. This is a clean solution that safely aborts ping.exe. The best part about this solution is that it doesn't require for any console prompts to be visible. An alternate solution was to start the cmd.exe process with a visible window, and then to issue a MainWindowClose command, but this required for a window to be visible. I put this code together to allow for me to better interact with HandbrakeCLI and FFMPEG. Enjoi NET_Proc.zip


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