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eaolson

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About eaolson

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  1. 889 downloads

    Copyright © 2007, <Eric Olson> All rights reserved. Author: Eric Olson --see readme file for contact information Description: Handles ID3v1 and v1.1 tags from MP3 files. Tags can be read, written, and deleted from files. This package does not handle the more complicated ID3v2 tags. Dependencies: Requires oglib_file and oglib_error available from www.openg.org. Change Log: 1.0.0: Initial release of the code. 1.0.1: Added Validate ISO 8859-1 String to distribution zip file.
  2. Name: MP3 ID3v1 Tags Submitter: LAVA 1.0 Content Submitted: 03 Jul 2009 Category: Database & File IO LabVIEW Version: 8.2 Version: 1.0.1 License Type: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Potentially make this available on the VI Package Network?: Undecided Copyright © 2007, <Eric Olson> All rights reserved. Author: Eric Olson --see readme file for contact information Description: Handles ID3v1 and v1.1 tags from MP3 files. Tags can be read, written, and deleted from files. This package does not handle the more complicated ID3v2 tags. Dependencies: Requires oglib_file and oglib_error available from www.openg.org. Change Log: 1.0.0: Initial release of the code. 1.0.1: Added Validate ISO 8859-1 String to distribution zip file. Click here to download this file
  3. eaolson

    Game of Life

    1,251 downloads

    Author: Eric Olson --see readme file for email address Description: Conway's Game of Life is a fun little simulation of a group of cells. How new cells are born and how old cells die is decided by a simple set of rules, but can lead to complicated behavior by the entire colony. I've always found this simulation to be interesting and I thought coding it in LabVIEW would be a fun exercise. Comments and critiques of either the game or of my coding style are always welcome. The basic rules are simple: 1. A cell that has one or zero neighbors dies of lonliness. 2. A cell that has four or more neighbors dies of overcrowding. 3. An empty cell that has exactly three neighbors containes a new cell in the following generation. A thorough explanation of the Game can be found at http://web.archive.o...7s_game_of_life . Dependancies: This uses the OpenG time, file, and variantconfig libraries. They are not included. Download them via the OpenG Package Manager: http://web.archive.o...p?showtopic=233 Change Log: 1.0.0: Initial release of the code. 1.0.1: Include readme.txt in the zip file. 1.1.0: Added Open and Save As functions (in the menubar). Added an About dialog. Removed the Exit button (redundant to Close). 1.1.1: Forgot to include the .rtm file in the distribution. Rows/columns now update when opening a .gol file.
  4. File Name: Game of Life File Submitter: LAVA 1.0 Content File Submitted: 02 Jul 2009 File Updated: 02 Jul 2009 File Category: General LabVIEW Version: 7.1 File Version: 1.1.1 License Type: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Potentially make this file available on the VI Package Network?: Undecided Author: Eric Olson --see readme file for email address Description: Conway's Game of Life is a fun little simulation of a group of cells. How new cells are born and how old cells die is decided by a simple set of rules, but can lead to complicated behavior by the entire colony. I've always found this simulation to be interesting and I thought coding it in LabVIEW would be a fun exercise. Comments and critiques of either the game or of my coding style are always welcome. The basic rules are simple: 1. A cell that has one or zero neighbors dies of lonliness. 2. A cell that has four or more neighbors dies of overcrowding. 3. An empty cell that has exactly three neighbors containes a new cell in the following generation. A thorough explanation of the Game can be found at http://web.archive.o...7s_game_of_life . Dependancies: This uses the OpenG time, file, and variantconfig libraries. They are not included. Download them via the OpenG Package Manager: http://web.archive.o...p?showtopic=233 Change Log: 1.0.0: Initial release of the code. 1.0.1: Include readme.txt in the zip file. 1.1.0: Added Open and Save As functions (in the menubar). Added an About dialog. Removed the Exit button (redundant to Close). 1.1.1: Forgot to include the .rtm file in the distribution. Rows/columns now update when opening a .gol file. Click here to download this file
  5. Version 1.0.0

    1,391 downloads

    Author: Eric Olson --see readme file for email address Description: This driver is an implementation of the Microsoft two-button mouse protocol, for using a serial mouse or trackball. It polls a specified serial port at a specified rate, and reads any data waiting there. This has been tested under LabVIEW versions 7.1.1, 8.0.1, and 8.20 under Windows 2000 and Windows XP, and under LabVIEW Real-Time 7.1.1 and 8.0.1. This driver contains components created using the dqGOOP toolkit to enable object-oriented programming. Note: When using a serial mouse under Windows, it is important that Windows not auto-detect the existence of the mouse (e.g. upon bootup). Otherwise, the operating system will intercept the mouse input and LabVIEW will never see it. Dependencies: None Version history: 1.0.0: Intial release of the code License: University of Illinois/NCSA Open Source License (view license.txt for complete verbiage).
  6. Name: Serial Mouse Driver for LabVIEW Submitter: eaolson Submitted: 01 Jul 2009 File Updated: 03 Jan 2011 Category: Hardware LabVIEW Version: 7.1 License Type: Other (included with download) Author: Eric Olson --see readme file for email address Description: This driver is an implementation of the Microsoft two-button mouse protocol, for using a serial mouse or trackball. It polls a specified serial port at a specified rate, and reads any data waiting there. This has been tested under LabVIEW versions 7.1.1, 8.0.1, and 8.20 under Windows 2000 and Windows XP, and under LabVIEW Real-Time 7.1.1 and 8.0.1. This driver contains components created using the dqGOOP toolkit to enable object-oriented programming. Note: When using a serial mouse under Windows, it is important that Windows not auto-detect the existence of the mouse (e.g. upon bootup). Otherwise, the operating system will intercept the mouse input and LabVIEW will never see it. Dependencies: None Version history: 1.0.0: Intial release of the code License: University of Illinois/NCSA Open Source License (view license.txt for complete verbiage). Click here to download this file
  7. QUOTE (lal @ Dec 12 2008, 02:27 PM) None of those are booleans. It's not quite clear what you're doing here. You can pass out all of the values from inside a loop by right-clicking on the tunnel, and selecting "Enable indexing." Then you'll have all the values and can do whatever you want with them.
  8. QUOTE (kaarthik_kaarthik @ Dec 12 2008, 12:19 AM) You should be able to open, edit, and save the html file like any other text file. Read it in as a string, find the flashVars/volumeLevel variable and change it, then write it back to the file. It would then be the responsibility of the browser or of Flash to notice that the file had changed and to adjust the volume level accordingly.
  9. QUOTE (neB @ Oct 2 2008, 07:43 AM) I've only ever found and reported a couple of LabVIEW bugs, but I do have to say the sheer variety in the number of places where they are posted is annoying. You've got the general NI forums, the NI bug forum, the LAVA bug thread, and who knows where else. Finding out if a bug is a known issue or not is actually fairly difficult and means searching in several different places. (Why on Earth, when you are reporting bugs, would you collect them by the month in which they were discovered?) Personally, I just with NI would have something publicly available like Bugzilla, but that's probably bad PR.
  10. eaolson

    Alfa String

    QUOTE (alfa @ Oct 1 2008, 02:07 AM) So it's kind of like Nevada?
  11. I've been fascinated by Stack Overflow lately. It's a neat way to get answers to any simple programming question you might have, or just to probe the opinion of a number of professionals. But the way the whole site works is unlike anything I've used before, too. It's like Usenet meets a wiki crossed with digg. There's not a lot of LabVIEW content there at the moment, however.
  12. I've got a typedef tab control, and when I open the VI, the contents of the first page are displayed in the control, even though the first page is not the active tab. I've attached an example VI. When test tab.vi is opened, you'll notice the String page is active, but the Boolean control is visible. This persists even when the VI is run. Switching pages makes the correct controls display. This only seems to happen when the tab control is a typedef, but I haven't done any thorough testing. Already reported to NI, CAR #127705. Crossposted from the dark side.
  13. QUOTE (ASTDan @ Sep 18 2008, 01:06 PM) I read his Style Guide a while back, but forgot he mentioned this sort of thing. That's a very thorough file template. There's also a good Project Specification template at the same location.
  14. QUOTE (Shaun Hayward @ Sep 19 2008, 04:43 PM) Why not? You could always just create a branch of the first project for the second project. Or, you could also export a copy of the first project and use that as the starting point for your second.
  15. QUOTE (crelf @ Sep 19 2008, 12:03 PM) I think there's a lot to be said for (a) organization and (b) consistency. One of the advantages of style guides is that they push you to doing both. E. g., there's no particular reason for OpenG to use that particular shade of green for its VIs, but it's a lot nicer than if those palettes were a rainbow of different colors.
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