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george seifert

TortoiseSVN setup question

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We're a relatively small development group. There will probably be at most 3 people (but usually just me) accessing the code. Do you know if it's necessary to have a special server or could we just have the repository on a network drive? If we do set it up that way at first would it be hard to migrate to a server later if necessary?

George

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We're a relatively small development group. There will probably be at most 3 people (but usually just me) accessing the code. Do you know if it's necessary to have a special server or could we just have the repository on a network drive? If we do set it up that way at first would it be hard to migrate to a server later if necessary?

George

It's a Subversion question, but anyway... As soon as you have more than one developer you need to access repository through a server. Otherwise you're just begging for repository corruption.

Br, Mike

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We're a relatively small development group. There will probably be at most 3 people (but usually just me) accessing the code. Do you know if it's necessary to have a special server or could we just have the repository on a network drive? If we do set it up that way at first would it be hard to migrate to a server later if necessary?

George, you could do this (I did) - but I wouldn't necessarily recommend it.

One of the problems of keeping the repository on a network drive is that any random person can accidentally move, delete or rename the path to them.oops.gif

To move from the shared drive to a server I had to do the following steps (from memory):

sad.gifexport the repository using Subversion (I had to install it just to do this).

angry.gifThe very large file resulting then had to be imported into the new repository on the server by one of our IT guys

ohmy.gif All the working copies then have to be changed to point at the new repositories (using the relocate command)

frusty.gif This only works if the repository has not changed since you exported it!!!!

Hope this guides your decision.... wink.gif

Alex

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Thanks guys. Sounds like I better get IT involved from the get go.

Sorry I knew it was a Subversion question (I am using it for LV though), but I knew how helpful everyone is anyway.

George

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Thanks guys. Sounds like I better get IT involved from the get go.

Sorry I knew it was a Subversion question (I am using it for LV though), but I knew how helpful everyone is anyway.

George

There's a great free (although it also has a paid "pro" version) subversion server called VisualSVN Server (http://visualsvn.net/server/) - it is super easy to modify repositories, etc and even plays nicely with Active Directory if your on a Windows Domain setup.

Shaun

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I was recently looking into this, and it might be worth looking into even if you are a smaller group of people assessing the code at this point in time. Effective use of SCC takes discipline because what is not checked into the repository is not saved. Opening a project several years after the fact to find out that the latest code resided on a long decommissioned computer is not a pleasant experience. It is in everyone's best interest to make sure that code is properly stored in the repository at all key points of the project's lifecycle.

The best way to maximize the effective utilization of SCC is to make it as easy to use for your staff as possible. As a result, we use a combination of two tools to manage our source code. The first is Tortoise SVN, an explorer shell based SCC system which works for almost any project type. The ease of use and concurrent-development options of TSVN have dramatically boosted our ability to collaborate, release and maintain code. By itsef, TSVN is revolutionary if you are coming from an older style of source code control. Paired with Visual SVN Server, the benefits become even more pronounced.

Here is a link for more information: http://www.dmcinfo.c...t-anywhere.aspx

Hope that is at very least, informative!

We're a relatively small development group. There will probably be at most 3 people (but usually just me) accessing the code. Do you know if it's necessary to have a special server or could we just have the repository on a network drive? If we do set it up that way at first would it be hard to migrate to a server later if necessary?

George

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Hello,

I am a Tortoise user, but I use the wrong way for my repositories (they are on a network drive, so I do "file:"... accesses).

I'd like to access my repositories from everywhere in the world, using a real server.

I installed Visual SVN as you suggest it, but I did it on MY pc, and I get a "https://nameofmypc/svn/nameofmyproject/" URL, so my repositories are not accessible from anywhere throught the internet.

Does anyone can explain me how can I finally get a URL in the good form ?

I think I need a web server with a domain name, or put my IP in the url, but I don't know how to do that.

Thanks,

Callahan.

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Hello Callahan,

I wouldn't use your own server for serious public hosting. There are free (or almost free) hosting options for SVN available.

But if you insist, you need a few things, an domain address that points to your computer's IP-address. Most likely your computer is not directly connected to the internet, but via a router, so you need to set up the firewall or NAT of the router to point port 80 to your internal computer IP address.

If your computer is at work you'll need to consult IT for the exact configurations.

Ton

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Thanks for your answer.

I understand that configuring my own server would be a bad idea.

Can you explain me the "free hosting options for SVN" ?

What is the complete procedure to do that ?

If I use a free web hosting, how create, manage, back-up etc.. the repositories ?

Tortoise is the traditionnal way for the windows subversion client, what is the traditionnal way for free hosting ?

Is this solution adapted to your profesionnal LabVIEW projects ?

Callahan

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There is to the client no difference where the repository is hosted (as long as there is a reliable internet connection), there might be a speed issue.

Every hosting provider has there own set of tools for managing repositories.

Ton

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