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SuperS_5

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About SuperS_5

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LabVIEW Information

  • Version
    LabVIEW 2010
  • Since
    2007
  1. The property node can be set to "ignore errors." This stops this propagating the error down to the other properties. (Incoming errors still cause the node to skip execution though.) In this mode, the first error is outputted, while execution continues. I believe we have done this in LV2010. The same code works in LV2011, but I don't think I have tried creating this scenario in LV2011. (Property node>property node of the same class.)
  2. I assume that you are using LV2010. (From your profile) We just recently upgraded to LV2011, and it a lot more stable. We had a lot of problems where LV would become very flaky when editing classes. (particularly if you tried to click faster then LV could finish loading screens, or had a lot of windows open. I never tried too hard to isolate the problems) Of course, there may be limitations, but if it is possible, I recommend upgrading.
  3. I used to play a lot of PC games, before getting into programming. This background taught my one hand to hover over the keyboard, quickly hitting multiple shortcuts without looking. The 100+Keys on the keyboard come in handy. (I can also use the mouse with either hand.) Trackpads, and single displays drive me crazy though.
  4. Hi, The message is related to the fact that your references are not defined types, just generic controls. On my system they are just warnings not errors. Maybe the error window gets a little confused sometimes.
  5. I have to agree with Daklu. I only start to use any kind of flow-charts/Pseudocode for very large programs. I usually define these when the program must be split up so that multiple developers can work simultaneously. On one project, I used the state chart module fairly effectively for a single developer.
  6. I you use the "separate compiled code from source" option, clearing the object cache may help. It is in some where in "my documents/LabVIEW data/". If the VI uses any ctl files, I would check them first. I have found that corruptions in type-defs to occur way too often. We now use 2010 SP1, while being a little more stable, we still see this kind of crash often. Good luck
  7. Every time I have seen this problem, the computer did not have enough RAM, and the swap file was heavily used. Upgrading the system RAM solved the problem. If you cannot upgrade the system RAM, and have windows 7, then ReadyBoost can be used to augment the system RAM. I currently have 8GB of RAM. (I was running out at 6GB)
  8. Hi everyone! A few of us at Enable have just passed our CLD's. Cheers and high fives all around. *Hint Hint: Look at my signature.*
  9. I removed my "hosts" file work around, and can still get LAVAG. :-) looks good.
  10. The message seams to suggest that you are low on system memory. How much RAM/page file do you have? How much free RAM do you have then you get (and just before you get) the error? (If you have plenty of available RAM when the error occurs, then I completely agree with Yair, above.
  11. There are several white papers and various forum threads on the use of parallelized for loops. I believe it is not very useful to nest parallelized for loop. Not wiring the P terminal, will yield a number of threads equal to the logical processors. I think the way you have nested these for loops will cause twice the thread count, and not be more efficient then a single parallelized for loop, nested with another regular for loop. If you can reproduce the issue, you could submit it to NI on their forums.
  12. You can get the classic windows theme, which is settable globally for your whole system. It is included with Windows 7. Several WinXP themes are also available, again settable globally. It is also possible to "disable visual themes" for LV. (or any application) This is accessible via the application properties pop-up from the context right click. As for LabVIEW only, WinXP theme, you would have to make customized buttons.
  13. As mentioned, a daemon always polling for updates is the most robust method. This allows for the updater app to make significant changes, without user interaction. The main app can update the updater whenever necessary. (Would eventually be very infrequent) Either by the updater sending an "update me" message, or the main app polling. A simplistic approach is to use batch files. Your app will poll for updates. When found, create a batch file that completes the copy, and restarts your app. In the most sloppy method, running the batch file (without waiting for the return) and immediately
  14. Hi, I am still learning about LVOOP, but here is the little I do know. A static dispatch VI is mostly a regular VI that is owned by the class. A dynamic dispatch VI is sort of "similar" to a polymorphic VI. For each of these VIs, a replacement can be made for each child class. (A class can be a child of a class, of a class, ... etc) If the child class is used instead of the parent class, the "replacement" VI would be used instead of the original dynamic dispatch VI. These replacements are defined by the same connector pane, and VI name. (The owning class name will be different) Th
  15. Setting the boolean to true allows it to work....cool. I also tried changing the string to contain actual content, and using an uninitialized array. Both didn't work. I originally thought that this was related to the cluster, but an array of strings, or variants also crash LabVIEW.
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