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Degree Symbol


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Hello,

This hopefully will be a simple question.

I am working on some code and to my supprise it has a degree symbol (little circle above numbers). I didn't know LabVIEW had this capibility. I have been trying to figure this out for years. How do you insert a degree symbol into a string?

Thanks

Happy Holidays!

Dan

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QUOTE(ASTDan @ Dec 28 2007, 03:01 PM)

Hello,

This hopefully will be a simple question.

I am working on some code and to my supprise it has a degree symbol (little circle above numbers). I didn't know LabVIEW had this capibility. I have been trying to figure this out for years. How do you insert a degree symbol into a string?

Thanks

Happy Holidays!

Dan

well on windows you can hold down the ALT key then using the keypad enter the ascii code for the character you want , if remember correctly the degree is ALT-167 ....

Dan

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QUOTE(Dan Bookwalter @ Dec 28 2007, 03:12 PM)

well on windows you can hold down the ALT key then using the keypad enter the ascii code for the character you want , if remember correctly the degree is ALT-167 ....

You can also used the Windows character map to find the symbol (it's in the Symbols font), copy it to the clipboard, then paste it into LabVIEW.

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QUOTE(Dan Bookwalter @ Dec 28 2007, 12:12 PM)

well on windows you can hold down the ALT key then using the keypad enter the ascii code for the character you want , if remember correctly the degree is ALT-167 ....

Dan

ALT+0176 will give you a smaller version. Hold either ALT key and type 0176 on the keypad (you must use the keypad - the numbers above the keyboard will not work).

ALT+167 = º

ALT+0176 = °

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QUOTE(TobyD @ Dec 28 2007, 01:05 PM)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degree_symbol

QUOTE

On
's
, the degree sign can be typed by
-
-8 on most
, including Australian, British, Canadian and U.S. Extended layouts. (Option-K, on the other hand, is "ring above") On
, the degree sign can be typed by ALT + 0176 on the
. On Linux and other
systems, many
allow typing the degree sign with
+Shift+0.

Due to a similar appearance in some
in print and on computer screens, some other characters may be mistakenly substituted for it: the "masculine
" (U+00BA, º ), the "ring above" (U+02DA, ˚ ), "
zero" (U+2070, ⁰ ), superscript zero proper (
0
) or superscript letter "o" (
o
), and the "ring operator" (U+2218, ∘ ).

So, like everyone said, but ALT+0176 is the only "proper" degree symbol (U+00B0, °) (I just learned this today).

---

Adam Rofer

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QUOTE(AdamRofer @ Dec 28 2007, 02:05 PM)

So, like everyone said, but ALT+0176 is the only "proper" degree symbol (U+00B0, °) (I just learned this today).

In a legacy from MS-DOS days, you can also generate this character with ALT-248. My other favorite is ALT-241, which gets you plus-or-minus (±). You can use this method to generate any of the 'standard' 8-bit ASCII characters 0-255.

Jason

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Wow super cool. Now to fully open a can of worms. Where can I find a list of all common symbols i.e. degree, plus minus, etc. Where is the ASCII codes for all this stuff. I wasn't aware of the Alt+176

Thanks.

Also on a comment note wouldn't it be cool if there was a Open G library that contained common symbols like the one posted by PJM_LabVIEW.

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QUOTE(ASTDan @ Dec 29 2007, 03:38 PM)

QUOTE(Dan Bookwalter @ Dec 29 2007, 05:19 PM)

Well LabVIEW has an ASCII table included: <ctrl-?>, search, ASCII Codes, and at #29 is a table.

But unfortunately it's incomplete, only the first 127 charactars are shown.

Ton

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QUOTE(tcplomp @ Dec 29 2007, 01:09 PM)

Well LabVIEW has an ASCII table included: <ctrl-?>, search, ASCII Codes, and at #29 is a table.

But unfortunately it's incomplete, only the first 127 charactars are shown.

Ton

It's complete. ASCII doesn't define more than that. The rest are extended characters that depend on the currently set local, the font used etc, etc.

Rolf Kalbermatter

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