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Darren

NI
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Everything posted by Darren

  1. There is a different API for Installer Builder. It is also not officially supported by NI, but there are a couple of examples that ship with the API to help you learn how to use it: [LabVIEW 20xx]\vi.lib\InstallerBuilder\examples
  2. Darren

    HP48

    Aww man, I loved my HP 48GX. Bought it in high school. Sold it after college because I needed the money. I still have my HP 32SII, which is the best non-graphing calculator I've ever owned. I know @Fab still uses an HP 48, she probably knows how to convert degrees to radians.
  3. I feel like I've exported data from DETT before, but it's been a long time since I've used it, I don't remember any details. Hopefully somebody else reading this has more info.
  4. That manual is for the Real-Time Execution Trace Toolkit, which I believe has been deprecated. To my knowledge, the Desktop Execution Trace Toolkit has never included this functionality.
  5. I was already used to it because I used this right-click plugin from LabVIEW 2015 until the feature was added natively in LabVIEW 2019. Also, for cleaning up wires, I find selecting one or more wires and pressing Ctrl-U to be faster than right-clicking each single wire and selecting Clean Up Wire.
  6. I think @Aristos Queue added that in LabVIEW 2019.
  7. No idea, I just saw "All of the icons are free for both personal and commercial use" on the main page, with no mention of including license info.
  8. I found this tonight while working on a project: https://remixicon.com/ Really good icon library with modern-looking icons where you can customize the color and size of the icons, then download them as PNG files. I then import them into a LabVIEW pict ring and it's off to the races.
  9. Oops, looks like I missed when this feature went in. As AristosQueue mentioned in a reply to your Idea Exchange post, you can use the Dependencies > Missing Dependency Names and Dependencies > Missing Dependency Paths properties of the GObject class in LabVIEW 2015 and later. Can you verify that these properties give you want you need, and I'll close out the Idea Exchange post as Already Implemented?
  10. Unfortunately there is currently (as of LabVIEW 2019) no comparable functionality to the Missing VI Name/Missing VI Path from subVIs for typedefs, nor is this functionality going to be in LabVIEW 2020. I suggest posting this request on the LabVIEW Idea Exchange. It would be a useful feature for tooling like what you've described.
  11. He's talking about edit-time panel and diagram menus and run-time diagram menus that are implemented as right-click plugins. This bug fix does not affect right-clicks in the project window.
  12. I don't know of a way to do this. The closest thing would be to show the Tools palette with the 'Tools Palette Open' property, then use OS calls (like user32.dll on Windows) to simulate a mouse click to turn the auto tool on/off.
  13. This is a good idea. I suggest posting it to the Idea Exchange.
  14. Right, VI Analyzer Toolkit 2016 was the first version to officially support 64-bit LabVIEW. For unofficial support in previous versions, we have this resource: https://forums.ni.com/t5/VI-Analyzer-Enthusiasts/Using-the-VI-Analyzer-Toolkit-with-64-bit-LabVIEW/ta-p/3494395
  15. Yes, it's a LabVIEW Toolkit, which means you have to install it separately for each LabVIEW you have. Here's the download page where you can get whichever version (and bitness) toolkit installer(s) you need: https://www.ni.com/en-us/support/downloads/software-products/download.labview-vi-analyzer-toolkit.html
  16. The VI Analyzer has core components installed with LabVIEW, like the UI you're seeing. The VI Analyzer Toolkit is a separate install with 90+ tests, including the Complexity Metrics tests. So you need to install the VI Analyzer Toolkit to see the tests.
  17. I'll be there, presenting a regular session and a 7x7.
  18. I've written tools before that involved scripting probes onto wires. The way I facilitated communication between the executing probe and the scripting framework was through a named queue. I could pass the name of the probe VI (which ends up being the name shown in the first column of the Probe Watch Window) to my scripting framework. Meanwhile, my scripting framework had used the "AttachProbe" method of the Wire class to create the probe. This method returns a Probe reference, which you can then use with a property node to read the "ProbeVI" property, which gives you a VI reference, and you ca
  19. You may want to consider using a Data Agnostic Smart Probe instead of a subVI. From that probe, you can get a reference to the calling VI. And I think there are ways to figure out which probes are on which wires, etc. Here's my nugget post on Data Agnostic Smart Probes: https://forums.ni.com/t5/LabVIEW/Darren-s-Occasional-Nugget-02-23-2018/m-p/3759109
  20. The official VIs are different implementations. I imagine they're faster, since their implementation is simpler (they just wrap Spreadsheet String to Array and Array to Spreadsheet String). Also the new VIs have the standard connector pane and official icons. You shouldn't have any issue continuing to use the hidden gems if you prefer those.
  21. No problem, I just want to make sure people know the difference between "Darren the G programmer says _____" and "Darren the NI employee says _____". In my "Don't Wait for LabVIEW R&D... Implement Your Own LabVIEW Features!" presentation, after I clarify that I'm presenting my personal opinion and not an official NI position, I contraindicate XControls because of numerous stability issues I've seen with them in large applications over the years. You can see my slides and watch a recording of the presentation here: http://bit.ly/dnattlvhooks
  22. Side note: I tried to look at the code, but I couldn't manage to get the snippets dragged into a LV 2019 diagram. Is there something special I have to do to download the .pngs so that they have the LV meta data necessary to make the snippet be droppable code?
  23. Variant attributes were optimized quite a bit over the years. For string-based keys, they are very efficient, especially if you don't need to cast to/from variant for the values.
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