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Found 16 results

  1. View File SQLite Library Introductory video now available on YouTube: Intro to SQLite in LabVIEW SQLite3 is a very light-weight, server-less, database-in-a-file library. See www.SQLite.org. This package is a wrapper of the SQLite3 C library and follows it closely. There are basically two use modes: (1) calling "Execute SQL" on a Connection to run SQL scripts (and optionally return 2D arrays of strings from an SQL statement that returns results); and (2) "Preparing" a single SQL statement and executing it step-by-step explicitly. The advantage of the later is the ability to "Bind" parameters to the statement, and get the column data back in the desired datatype. The "Bind" and "Get Column" VIs are set as properties of the "SQL Statement" object, for convenience in working with large numbers of them. See the original conversation on this here. Now hosted on the NI LabVIEW Tools Network. ***Requires VIPM 2017 or later for install.*** Submitter drjdpowell Submitted 06/19/2012 Category Database & File IO LabVIEW Version 2011 License Type BSD (Most common)  
  2. drjdpowell

    SQLite Library

    Version 1.10.0

    8,640 downloads

    Introductory video now available on YouTube: Intro to SQLite in LabVIEW SQLite3 is a very light-weight, server-less, database-in-a-file library. See www.SQLite.org. This package is a wrapper of the SQLite3 C library and follows it closely. There are basically two use modes: (1) calling "Execute SQL" on a Connection to run SQL scripts (and optionally return 2D arrays of strings from an SQL statement that returns results); and (2) "Preparing" a single SQL statement and executing it step-by-step explicitly. The advantage of the later is the ability to "Bind" parameters to the statement, and get the column data back in the desired datatype. The "Bind" and "Get Column" VIs are set as properties of the "SQL Statement" object, for convenience in working with large numbers of them. See the original conversation on this here. Now hosted on the NI LabVIEW Tools Network. ***Requires VIPM 2017 or later for install.***
  3. drjdpowell

    SQLite for OpenG

    Hello, I’ve been working with SQLite for a logging application and I thought I might offer my SQLite LabVIEW wrapper for possible inclusion in OpenG. There are at least two other implementations out there, both with licensing restrictions, but it would be nice to have this in OpenG as I think SQLite is a major addition to the capabilities of LabVIEW. Below is a zip file; it includes a couple of examples. SQLite LabVIEW.zip LabVIEW 2011. SQLite dll for Windows (32-bit) included. NOTE: more recent version now in the Code Repository. An (incomplete) menu: Here is the block diagram of Example2: There are basically two use modes: (1) calling “Execute SQL” on a Connection to run SQL scripts (and optionally return 2D arrays of strings or variants from an SQL statement that returns results); and (2) “Preparing" a single SQL statement and executing it step-by-step explicitly. The advantage of the later is the ability to “Bind” parameters to the statement, and get the column data back in the desired datatype. The “Bind” and “Get Column” VIs are set as properties of the “SQL Statement” object, for convenience in working with large numbers of them. This package closely follows the SQLite C/C++ interface and is intended to facilitate the execution of SQL scripts, rather than provide VIs that substitute for SQL statements. Thus there are no VIs for creating tables, triggers, etc. The SQLite website provides extensive documentation of SQL and the C/C++ interface. The only differences from the C/C++ interface are: 1) “Reset” and “Finalize” do not return the error code from the previous “Step” (as this would be both unnecessary an confusing in LabVIEW) 2) The default busy timeout for waiting for a database file that is temporarily “busy” due to another connection is set at 5000 ms, rather than 0 ms. 3) I created a “First Step” VI that wraps “Step”, intended to be the first call on Step that actually execute the statement (further calls to Step increment through return result rows). I did this to allow future potential retry logic in “First Step”, and to have a clearer set of VI icons showing the difference between executing a statement and stepping through result rows. As I said, it would be really nice to have an SQLite interface in OpenG. I’ve only just scratched the surface of what can be done with SQLite (see, for example, the “Full Text Search” and “R*tree” extensions). — James
  4. drjdpowell

    Cyth SQLite Logger

    Version 1.5.5

    1,761 downloads

    A logger and log viewer using an SQLite database. The logger is a background process that logs at about once per second. A simple API allows log entries to be added from anywhere in a program. A Log Viewer is available under the Tools menu (Tools>>Cyth Log Viewer); this can alternately be built into a stand-alone executable. Requires SQLite Library (Tools Network). Log Viewer also requires [CR]Shortcut Menu from Cluster and the JKI StateMachine Toolkit (Tools Network). Notes: — Version 1.4.0 is the last available for LabVIEW 2011. New development in LabVIEW 2013. — newest version requires VIPM 2014 or later for install.
  5. Hi Lava Citizens, I am trying to implement SQLite - update function so i can easily modify values in a selected row. http://www.sqlitetutorial.net/sqlite-update/ I have tried this statement - UPDATE ESD_User SET Name = 'James Bond', Status = 'Employee', Location = 'Canada' WHERE EmployeeID = 5; using the DB Browser for SQLite. The command does update the values as expected. I am trying to do same with the labview + sqlite driver. I have attached the update user code. I am getting an error from EXEC SQL "SQLite.lvlib:Connection.lvclass:Execute SQL (Single String).vi:760001:Step on "UPDATE ESD_User SET Name = 'James Bond', Status = 'Employee', Location = 'Canada' WHERE EmployeeID = 5;" SQLITE_BUSY: database is locked." Can you please explain the cause of this error? Thank you, max
  6. Question: I'm trying to determine the 'best' way to structure my data when storing to disk. My data comes from a variety of different sensor types and with quite different rates - e.g. temperature data (currently) as a 1D array of temperatures and a timestamp [time, t1, t2, ..., tn] at maybe 1 Hz and analog waveform data from load cells at data rates ~O(kHz). I also want to be able to read back data from previous experiments and replot on a similar graph. Reading threads on this forum and at NI I'm uncertain if I'll be better pursuing a set of TDMS files, probably one per sensor type stored at the group/channel level, then at the end of an experiment, collating the TDMS files into one master file and defragmenting, or trying instead to write to a SQLite database. (I have nearly no experience using SQL, but no problem learning - drjdpowell's youtube video was already very informative.) An alternative possibility mentioned in a thread somewhere here was to write TDMS files, then store records on which files hold what data in what I understood to be a catalogue-style SQL database. Could anyone with a clearer idea/head than me comment on which avenues are dark tracks down which time will be easily lost in failed attempts, and which seem likely to be worth trying? Background: I'm currently rewriting some code I wrote last year based on the 'Continuous Measurement and Logging' template/project. The logging in that case was writing to a single, binary file. Keeping my data format in line as I changed sensor arrangement became increasingly annoying and an ever expanding series of block diagrams lead me to start on the 'Actor Framework' architecture. I have some initial progress with setting up actors and generating some simulated data, passing it around and getting it from different formats onto a waveform or XY-graph (can be chosen by choice of child class to insert into a subpanel). I'm now looking to write the logging code such that I have basic implementations of several of the components before I try and write out all of the measurement components and so on - I already have a temperature measurement library for an LTC2983 based PCB and so can use that to test (with hardware) inputting 1D arrays, whilst I'm planning to use just the sine wave VIs to test waveform input. I'm not so far into this set of coding that anything is set in stone yet, and so I want to at least try and start off in the right direction. Whilst it seems likely changes to requirements or plans will require modifications to whatever I write, it would be nice if those weren't of the same magnitude as the entire (e.g. logging) codebase. Apologies for the somewhat verbose post.
  7. ShaunR

    SQlite Session Extension

    A new feature called the "Session Extension" has just been rolled into the trunk of latest release of SQLite (3.13.0). From the authors: In a nutshell you can "diff" a database and produce a patchfile of the changes (and the reverse). Now. Most are probably thinking source code control at this point which isn't very interesting in terms of LabVIEW. However. There is another use case - synchronizing remote acquisition databases. Previously we could have a SQLite database to store acquired data in, say, a cRIO or PXI chassis. Periodically we would want to back up or synchronize another database either for back up, offline exploitation or the file was becoming too large to store.. This meant making a backup copy locally and then sending the entire database file to the recipient. That could take a long time, was fraught with problems of disconnection and there may have not been enough space to create a copy. With this new feature we should be able to overcome or at least alleviate these issues and effectively implement "restore points" and "staged updates" for remote databases as well as bandwidth reduction while synchronising and configuring. For example. We may store configuration information, amongst other things, in the database and only want to update that section. We may only want the last 24 hours of data sent back for exploitation. We may only want error or waveform meta information....and so on. I'm looking forward to playing with this feature over the next few weeks. so if you have suggestions for another use-case, then I would like to hear it.
  8. hey guys, I'm pretty new to Labview and very new to databases. I found SQLite and thought it would be a good fit for a new project, but I'm having a hard time getting the where statements to work so I get the data I'm expecting. Ive created a table in a database editor called parts, it has two fields part type and serial number. I scan a tag to get a serial number and would like my database call to return the appropriate part type. Right now I only have one value in each column ( a single serial number and a single part type). I tried to use the "?" and bind the serial number to it but kept getting zero returned values. I can get the part type value by saying "SELECT PartType FROM Parts". I must be doing something very simple wrong, I tried to look on the SQLite.org but really wasnt sure what I was missing in the syntax section for select. any help would be great, Thanks
  9. ancle

    SQlite update time

    I used sqlite api to update my data, my array is 7x30. It takes 1.5s, is any methods can improve speed? Thank you! B/R Ancle
  10. View File Cyth SQLite Logger A logger and log viewer using an SQLite database. The logger is a background process that logs at about once per second. A simple API allows log entries to be added from anywhere in a program. A Log Viewer is available under the Tools menu (Tools>>Cyth Log Viewer); this can alternately be built into a stand-alone executable. Requires SQLite Library (Tools Network). Log Viewer also requires [CR]Shortcut Menu from Cluster and the JKI StateMachine Toolkit (Tools Network). Notes: — Version 1.4.0 is the last available for LabVIEW 2011. New development in LabVIEW 2013. — newest version requires VIPM 2014 or later for install. Submitter drjdpowell Submitted 03/08/2013 Category Database & File IO LabVIEW Version  
  11. shoneill

    SQLite open and Read

    A new SQLite question: I have, during testing, created several multi-GB files which I can use for read testing. I notice that upon first access (after loading LabVIEW) the query to get data takes sometimes exactly as long as if the file was not indexed at all. Subsequent reads are fast (drops from 30sec to 100 msec). 1) Has anyone else seen this? 2) Is this normal (Loading Index into memory) 3) How do I make the first file access fast? Shane
  12. Attached is a beta version of the latest 1.6 version of SQLite Library, for anyone who like to give feedback. A major addition (not yet well tested) is “Attributesâ€, modeled on Variant Attributes or Waveform Attributes, but stored in any SQLite db file. The idea is to make it easy to store simple named parameters without much effort. See the example “SQLite Attributes.viâ€. A more minor upgrade is making “Execute SQL†polymorphic, so as to return data in a number of forms in addition to a 2D-array of strings. See the upgraded example “SQLite Example 1 — Create Table.vi†which uses the new polymorphic VI, including showing how to return results as a Cluster. For Attributes, I had to make some choices in how to store the various LabVIEW types in SQLite’s limited number of types. The format I decided on is: 1) all simple types that already have a defined mapping (i.e. a “Bind†property node) are stored as defined (so strings and paths are Text, DBLs and Singles are Float, integers (except U64) are Integers. 2) Timestamps are ISO-8601 Text (the most standardized format of the four possibilities) 3) Enums are stored as the item text as Text, rather than the integer value. This seems the most robust against changes in the enum definition. 4) LVOOP objects are stored flattened in a Blob. 5) any other LV type is, contained in a Variant, flattened and stored in a Blob. Using a flattened Variant means we store the type information and LabVIEW version. drjdpowell_lib_sqlite_labview-1.6.0.51.vip LabVIEW 2011-2015 The Attribute stuff grew out of a project where SQLite files held the data, one for each “Runâ€, and the Runs had lots of small bits of information that needed to be stored in addition to the bulk of the data. When and where the measurement was taken, what the equipment setup was, who the Operator was, etc. I purpose-made a name-value look-up table for this, but realized that such a table could be made into reusable “attributesâ€.
  13. From the album: ShaunR

    SQLite database statistical analysis with AES 256 CBC encryption. N.B. 1. Multiple encoding runs produce new database byte-map. - differential analysis resistant. 2. Statistically indistinguishable from random data. - statistical analysis resistant.
  14. From the album: ShaunR

    SQLite database statistical analysis with AES 128 ECB encryption. N.B. 1. Multiple encoding runs produce identical database byte-map - susceptible to differential analysis. 2. Information leakage and correlation especially for zero values - susceptible to statistical analysis..
  15. ShaunR

    SQLite API - No Encryption

    From the album: ShaunR

    SQLite database statistical analysis without encryption
  16. I briefly mentioned a logging API that I've been using for logging errors, warnings etc to a SQLite database in the NLog thread. Since it seemed to be of interest, I thought I'd knock together a demo so that peeps could see how I use it and demonstrate some of the features using database enables above and beyond boring old text file logs (it requires the SQLite API for Labview installed) So here she is..... If people approve and think it's useful, I will add it to the SQLite API for Labview as an example.
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