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Nomen.Nescio

Once again: vi version conversion

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I wanted to ask if there is an actually (workable) solution to load one or more VIs, which are created in a newer version than the one I used (cf. https://lavag.org/topic/11502-conversion-new-to-old/ or https://forums.ni.com/t5/LabVIEW-Idea-Exchange/LabVIEW-Version-conversion-tool/idi-p/3167322 or https://forums.ni.com/t5/Version-Conversion/bd-p/VersionConversion ). It's NOT about EXECUTING, it's just about looking at the block diagram or converting it to a previous version. Unfortunately, NI does not still seem to offer a tool for doing so.

At www.labviewmakerhub.com there used to be a REVERT online tool. Unfortunately this is no longer available. In addition, in many cases there will be licensing and privacy barriers to upload any code to "online services". Specifically, I would have the problem that I'm programming a code of interest from github ( https://github.com/show6114/LV-string2hexview ) in 2016, but I have only 2015. Of course, you could always update your own version to never have such problems, on the other hand, not everyone is a version junkie and often there are also license obstacles in the way.

So my question in the round: Is there something new to solve such problems?

Alternatively, could someone be so nice to convert the code for me?

The latter would help me a lot - the former would be very interesting!

 

string2hex.vi

Open file in hex view.vi

Run all ASCII code.vi

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This is one of the reasons I still use 2009 (apart from performance and robustness :P ). The only viable option is to program in the minimum LabVIEW version you intend to support. It's one of the main issues with cooperative, group development and requires a strict regime of everyone sunchronizing versions in repositories. It can be done with different versions by back saving, but it usually ends in tears. Backward compatibilty in LabVIEW is exceptional. Forward compatibility requires a crystal ball and unicorn droppings.

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193/5000
 

 

@crossrulz: Thank you for your help!
@ShaunR: And how to open newer files than 2009 .... Otherwise, you are right, especially when thinking of the huge ballast of each new version ...
@ ALL: The version handling on LabVIEW I find absolutely scary. Is there really no way (for unprotected VIs) just to get to the block diagrams ???

 

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2 minutes ago, Nomen.Nescio said:

@ShaunR: And how to open newer files than 2009 .... Otherwise, you are right, especially when thinking of the huge ballast of each new version ...

@ ALL: The version handling on LabVIEW I find absolutely scary. Is there really no way (for unprotected VIs) just to get to the block diagrams ???

 

In a pinch, you can download the trial of the latest version and use that to back-save. It's not a permanent solution as the trial period is something like 7 days. Most developers subscribe to the NI SSP (Service and support package) and get yearly updates of the latest version but that doesn't mean there are no "issues" and the only workable solution is if everyone, in the entire company, is on the same version and upgrade at the same time.

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1 hour ago, ShaunR said:

It's not a permanent solution as the trial period is something like 7 days.

The trial gets extended to 45 days if you login with your NI credentials which is free to sign up for.  Also there are are VMs with snapshot features.  Beyond that a home edition of LabVIEW is pretty cheap but I think that is still stuck on LabVIEW 2014.

There were experiments in getting and viewing VIs as a series of PNGs, or flash which meant changing case structures to see other states.  If the developer is aware of it, snippets are useful and can mean posting an image, with the VI embedded in it.  You wouldn't want to do this on a whole project of course.

But in general Shaun is right.  Keep your code base in the oldest version of LabVIEW you want to support, and make decisions about upgrading as needed for newer hardware support, or feature sets.

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7 hours ago, hooovahh said:

 Also there are are VMs with snapshot features.

I often wondered about the legality of that. Technically, you need never buy a copy of LabVIEW if you just use a VM and are happy with the trial logo permeating the front panel. M$ have particular rules about VMs (and Apple actively prohibit their OS on them) but NI have never (to my knowledge) explained their stance on them.

Edited by ShaunR

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