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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/30/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    At the 2019 Americas Certified LabVIEW Architect Summit, GCentral was introduced to the LabVIEW Community. GCentral is a non profit organization (incorporated September 2019) composed of G community leaders creating a platform for programmers to find/use, contribute, and co-develop G code packages and collaboration resources. While GCentral is leading the charge to solve these problems, we will closely align with the community's needs. This forum is designed to connect GCentral's efforts with the community's needs. Some links to be aware of: GCentral.org LabVIEW Wiki Twitter (@GCentralOrg) LinkedIn Instagram (gcentralorg) Facebook Website GitHub Repo
  2. 1 point
    As someone contributing code on LAVA, I would like to see the certified LAVA repository packages made available through the GCentral package search tool.
  3. 1 point
    Company made version, based on Ref-based OO and active objects.
  4. 1 point
    As a company that uses LabVIEW and has it's own existing internal repository for reuse code, I would like a way for my developers to discover packages in G Central and in our private reuse repository, all from a single portal.
  5. 1 point
    Now you've got me thinking. I'm so habituated to creating typedefs, events, and registrations for every message. Maybe there's a better way...
  6. 1 point
    I don't have good examples to share, but here are a few helpful links for you: NI has an article dedicated to DVRs, which also explains the fundamental idea: http://www.ni.com/product-documentation/9386/en/ Here is a short video that explains how to use a DVR and some of the pitfalls: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIWzjnkqz1Q Of course, you'll find lots of topics related to DVRs on this forum.
  7. 1 point
    Apologies to JKI for not explicitly including State-Machine-Objects in the poll. Though I think what you compared was two common community frameworks, plus the framework you use, and largely developed, regardless of how common it is. Difficult to make such comparisons, as the stuff-you-know-well usually trumps stuff-you've-read-about. Even getting unbiased comparison categories is hard; I'd probably have "messaging pattern support" and "network communication", two things Messenger Library does well, yet not "Teststand Integration", which I've never tried.
  8. 1 point
    When I had to pick one, the options I considered were : DQMH AF JKI SMO G# ALOHA my own that would be much better than all of the above combined I picked DQMH because I love the API tester the scripting tools, also I feel there is a somewhat large community adoption and support.
  9. 1 point
    We use a variety of frameworks/templates/patterns for our architecture: The Actor Framework is used for asynchronous UI operations and long-running data processing tasks. Queued Message Handlers (not using DQMH or QMH template) handle simple asynchronous tasks. Action Engines encapsulate privately shared data for our translation and general I/O libraries. (Queued) State Machines ensure that everything runs in order. The proxy pattern is used to interface most customer libraries. We have our own frameworks for the test execution engine and test libraries (message based). I find the publicly available frameworks and templates (DQMH, Messanger Library, NI templates, etc...) very valuable for learning and to get things started quickly. More advanced projects, however, require a deeper understanding of the underlying patterns in order to develop your own architecture (which may or may not utilize these frameworks/templates). In your case these are synonymous 😋 "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." (Arthur C. Clarke) For some reason that just popped into my mind... If your entire architecture and thought process is fundamentally based on actors, any small project will of course have to depend on it as well. That is, unless you are willing to rethink (and probably reimplement) the fundamental architecture. Then again, why reinvent the wheel?
  10. 1 point
    We use the JKI State Machine, but have begun adding DQMHs. My last project launches up to twelve of them; my current project launches one or two. Both depend upon the number of pieces being tested (and were written by my CLA-colleague). I wanted to use JKI SMOs, but was given DQMH (and am happy about that, too).
  11. 1 point

    Version 1.4.1

    17,226 downloads

    UI Tools v1.4.0 Copyright © 2009-2016, François Normandin All rights reserved. Author:François Normandin Contact Info: Contact via PM on www.lavag.org LabVIEW Versions: Created and tested with LabVIEW 2012 Dependencies: OpenG Application Control Library >= 4.1.0.7 OpenG Array Library >= 4.1.1.14 OpenG File Library >= 4.0.1.22 OpenG LabVIEW Data Library >= 4.2.0.21 OpenG String Library >= 4.1.0.12 LAVA Palette >= 1.0.0.1 Description: This package contains tools for designing user interfaces. A first palette helps create special effects using transparency of front panel. Using them allows to quickly create fade-ins or outs using linear or exponential variation of the intensity. A second palette contains VIs to calculate the position of GObjects for many purposes like alignment, snap, mouse follow, etc. A third palette contains VIs to create dialog boxes based on class instances. "Simple Error Dialog" and "Simple Selection List" are featured with or without backrground blackening effect. A fourth palette includes some VIs to move objects programmatically on the front panel, using a basic deceleration algorithm to provide an impression of a smooth movement. The packaged VIs are all namespaced using a suffix “__lava_lib_ui_tools” which should not conflict with any of your own code. Includes: Front Panel Transparency (Fade In & Fade Out) Utilities (Alignment, Snap) Dialog (OOP based, extensible) Engine (Beta) for object movement Instructions: This package is distributed on the LabVIEW Tools Network (version 1.3) and updates are on LAVA (1.4). It can be installed directly in the addon folder of any LabVIEW version from 2012 to now. The addon installs automatically under the LAVA palette of the addon submenu. License: Distributed under the BSD license. Support: If you have any problems with this code or want to suggest features, please go to www.lavag.org and navigate to the discussion page.


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