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asbo

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Everything posted by asbo

  1. Check what version of Microsoft Jet you have installed. Your version of Windows may also play a role. Make sure the path to your data source is correct.
  2. You will need to use the LabVIEW PDA Module, but I have no idea if IMAQ is supported on that platform.
  3. 1) Double-click the Convert from Dynamic Data node. 2) In the configuration dialog, select Single waveform from the data type listbox. 3) Wire a Get Waveform Components to the output of the Convert node. You now have access to the Y array, as you did before, but now you can also retrieve the t0 and dt. These can be used to calculate the timestamp of any arbitrary index of the dataset.
  4. Forgive my ignorance, but how could you lock up an OS just by monitoring messages? If you wanted to start filtering them, it might start getting hairy, but I would expect that a listen-only approach would be quite safe.
  5. I don't understand what you're trying to do with the typecast. It looks like the effective result is just indexing the zeroth element. If that's what you want, you should use the Index Array node instead. If you know the offset of the byte(s) you're interested in, you can use the Index Array node to extract those as well. In general, it is extremely rare that Type Cast is the correct operation to be using in LabVIEW. You're writing to a chart, which retains all of the point written to it in a buffer up to a specific limit (1024 by default). Is it possible that your computer is not powerful enough to handle that? It would have to be a pretty old PC to struggle with that. Is it possible that the device feedback is slowing down? Further, you do not need to configure and close the VISA session on every loop iteration. Configure the port before the loop, pass the refnum in, and close it after the loop.
  6. Yep. They're handy for easy viewing but not for actual use. I wonder if the problem is with LabVIEW not handling the drag/drog correctly or the browser not publishing it properly? I'm leaning toward the latter, since apparently Opera works. Unless it's an OS thing, of course. Anyway... /sidebar.
  7. For some reason, it popped into my head that someone had already this and I actually thought it was you. Am I a fortune teller?
  8. What setup are you using that this actually works? Win7 x64/Chrome 21 just drops the URL and both IE9 & Firefox don't do anything
  9. You're correct, but the State of New York offered a matching granted of up to $850k. Now that the goal has been met, there's a minimum of $1.7mil available for purchasing, but my point was that with so much time left it's not too far from reasonable that a significant amount of donations continue to come in. Edit: At the time of posting, they're at $1,049,922, plus the matching $850k, for a total of $1,899,922 with 37 days left. Incredible.
  10. That's a shame On more that one occasion, I've wanted to search programmatically, but didn't have the time to try implementing a pure-G solution. Can anyone comment on how difficult it would be to add hooks in the future?
  11. I agree with hooovahh. In the past, I've seen projects use home-brew solutions to password protection and user authentication, but there was no built-in protection against anyone with a memory dump. Especially because we have so little control over the compiler, I think it'd be extraordinarily tough to make any guarantees that you're keeping your memory clean and safe; inplaceness can help in some areas, but we still never completely know how the compiler is handling any of our data. It's pretty painless to query Windows credentials, so I support that route of authentication as well - gives you a lot less code to work, to boot.
  12. We have a product which used a plugin architecture before packed projects were cool. I'll try to remember to take a peek at it and see if there's any secrets I can share. If memory serves, though, the build for the product didn't include any plugins de facto, which means the file hierarchy was scanned to pick up plugins. It would be very simple to have a build for the base product, builds for each plugin, and an installer to wrap everything in one package for distribution, though.
  13. We tend to use industrial computers primarily for the rack-mounting capabilities. In systems without racks, we have been using standard tower PCs lately. None of your hardware there necessitates a rack-mount, but it could provide a cleaner system in the end. For you, it's a matter of preference/budget.
  14. In a built application, you can have the VI complete normally (everything on the BD executes) and it will drop back to a non-running state (like it would in the IDE), but not close. Maybe there's a window setting wrong, but that's the kind of instance I use Quit LabVIEW in. I have seen one or two project where once in a while, they hang on shutdown for no apparent reason - BD is done, no asynchronous tasks, and yet it still won't quit. The solution in that case was using taskkill as part of cleanup, but I suspect Quit LabVIEW may have worked as well.
  15. This post on the MSDN forums has an example for automation of Communicator (the predecessor of Lync) through VBA - might be a good place to start.
  16. 41 days remaining and they're already at 86%? We're building a goddamn Tesla museum.
  17. It's a VI snippet. Save it to your computer and drag it into LabVIEW.
  18. Repros for me on LV2011 SP1. I think this is a legitimate bug, I would go ahead and submit your test case to NI: http://ni.com/ask
  19. Create a shift register on your loop, OR its value with the output from the boolean direction VI, and store the result back into the shift register. That value represents whether to turn the motor off.
  20. You should consider refactoring your code into a state machine. Another simple way to handle it instead would be to add a boolean shift register to the loop and set it based on your motor's state (hmm...).
  21. We use it fairly regularly to provide traceability from our requirements to software (usually LabVIEW/TestStand) to V&V. It's extremely helpful during development to get a rough idea of what functionality is covered already. I have only used it on one or two projects, but you're absolutely right that it takes some set-up time before you can evaluate it. Because all of our documents (requirements/V&V) a consistent template, we had to write parsers once and can just drop our own documents into a project. Sometimes, we have to write customer parsers to pull out of customer documents, but once you've had to do it once . We have used it for highly regulated industries (medical/aerospace), but just as much for more lax industries. Once you get the hang of it, it's easy to make it a part of your workflow and you come to depend on it like any other tool - it helps provide a lot of peace of mind by the time you get to acceptance testing.
  22. Two CARs resulted from this issue: CAR #366530: The Build Error lists blank spaces for the files that could not be found in the system CAR #366472: The Source Files page lists two empty spaces instead of file names Unfortunately, there's no easy way to identify the source of the blank files if you have this happen. What I did was remove everything from my Code folder and add directories back one by one until the build broke again. Repeat ad nauseum to isolate the source of the problem and hopefully something jumps out at you.
  23. Ah, quines. If you check the bottom of that article, you'll see there are some people who have way too much time on their hands. Tangentially related, Tupper's self-referential formula is a little bit of the same idea, though there's a bit of cheating using the definition of a constant.
  24. Here's the answer: I had two GIF files buried in an LVLIB inside of an LLB. I'm not sure how it happened, but the GIF files were missing from the LVLIB - presumably because you can't include GIF files in an LLB. Two GIF files, two blank items in my build, 0 warnings from anything but the build. I did end up passing the project code on to NI, I'll report back if there's a CAR for this.
  25. Typically, it's preferred to find the most specialized area of the forum that fits your post and just make one thread there.
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