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  1. How Software Companies Die – Orson Scott Card The environment that nurtures creative programmers kills management and marketing types - and vice versa. Programming is the Great Game. It consumes you, body and soul. When you're caught up in it, nothing else matters. When you emerge into daylight, you might well discover that you're a hundred pounds overweight, your underwear is older than the average first grader, and judging from the number of pizza boxes lying around, it must be spring already. But you don't care, because your program runs, and the code is fast and clever and tight. You won. You're aware that some people think you're a nerd. So what? They're not players. They've never jousted with Windows or gone hand to hand with DOS. To them C++ is a decent grade, almost a B - not a language. They barely exist. Like soldiers or artists, you don't care about the opinions of civilians. You're building something intricate and fine. They'll never understand it. Beekeeping - Here's the secret that every successful software company is based on: You can domesticate programmers the way beekeepers tame bees. You can't exactly communicate with them, but you can get them to swarm in one place and when they're not looking, you can carry off the honey. You keep these bees from stinging by paying them money. More money than they know what to do with. But that's less than you might think. You see, all these programmers keep hearing their fathers' voices in their heads saying "When are you going to join the real world?" All you have to pay them is enough money that they can answer (also in their heads) "Jeez, Dad, I'm making more than you." On average, this is cheap. And you get them to stay in the hive by giving them other coders to swarm with. The only person whose praise matters is another programmer. Less-talented programmers will idolize them; evenly matched ones will challenge and goad one another; and if you want to get a good swarm, you make sure that you have at least one certified genius coder that they can all look up to, even if he glances at other people's code only long enough to sneer at it. He's a Player, thinks the junior programmer. He looked at my code. That is enough. If a software company provides such a hive, the coders will give up sleep, love, health, and clean laundry, while the company keeps the bulk of the money. Out of Control - Here's the problem that ends up killing company after company. All successful software companies had, as their dominant personality, a leader who nurtured programmers. But no company can keep such a leader forever. Either he cashes out, or he brings in management types who end up driving him out, or he changes and becomes a management type himself. One way or another, marketers get control. But...control of what? Instead of finding assembly lines of productive workers, they quickly discover that their product is produced by utterly unpredictable, uncooperative, disobedient, and worst of all, unattractive people who resist all attempts at management. Put them on a time clock, dress them in suits, and they become sullen and start sabotaging the product. Worst of all, you can sense that they are making fun of you with every word they say. Smoked Out - The shock is greater for the coder, though. He suddenly finds that alien creatures control his life. Meetings, Schedules, Reports. And now someone demands that he PLAN all his programming and then stick to the plan, never improving, never tweaking, and never, never touching some other team's code. The lousy young programmer who once worshiped him is now his tyrannical boss, a position he got because he played golf with some sphincter in a suit. The hive has been ruined. The best coders leave. And the marketers, comfortable now because they're surrounded by power neckties and they have things under control, are baffled that each new iteration of their software loses market share as the code bloats and the bugs proliferate. Got to get some better packaging. Yeah, that's it. Originally from Windows Sources: The Magazine for Windows Experts, March 1995
    11 points
  2. Update to this post: My sabbatical has ended. I went from Blue Origin to Microsoft, but as of a couple weeks ago, I have now returned to LabVIEW development. At some point, I may put together a public summary of my experiences as a full-time G dev. For now, be assured that I am feeding that experience back into the feature backlog priority list!
    10 points
  3. TDF team is proud to propose for free download the scikit-learn library adapted for LabVIEW in open source. LabVIEW developer can now use our library for free as simple and efficient tools for predictive data analysis, accessible to everybody, and reusable in various contexts. It features various classification, regression and clustering algorithms including support vector machines, random forests, gradient boosting, k-means and DBSCAN, and is designed to interoperate with the Python numerical and scientific libraries NumPy and SciPy from the famous scikit-learn Python library. Coming soon, our team is working on the « HAIBAL Project », deep learning library written in native LabVIEW, full compatible CUDA and NI FPGA. But why deprive ourselves of the power of ALL the FPGA boards ? No reason, that's why we are working on our own compilator to make HAIBAL full compatible with all Xilinx and Intel Altera FPGA boards. HAIBAL will propose more than 100 different layers, 22 initialisators, 15 activation type, 7 optimizors, 17 looses. As we like AI Facebook and Google products, we will of course make HAIBAL natively full compatible with PyTorch and Keras. Sources are available now on our GitHub for free : https://www.technologies-france.com/?page_id=487
    9 points
  4. June 3 will be my last working day at NI. After almost 22 years, I'm stepping away from the company. Why? I found a G programming job in a field I love. Starting June 20, I'm going to be working at SpaceX on ground control for Falcon and Dragon. This news went public with customers at NI Connect this week. I figured I should post to the wider LabVIEW community here on LAVA. I want to thank you all for being amazing customers and letting me participate vicariously in so many cool engineering projects over the years. I'm still going to be a part of the LabVIEW community, but I'm not going to be making quite such an impact on G users going forward... until the day that they start needing developers on Mars -- remote desktop with a multi-minute delay between mouse clicks is such a pain! 🙂
    8 points
  5. What I do not understand about the decision to change it into a subscription model is the timing (and pricing). With the (predicted) failure of NXG, NI should lay low and try to save as many customers as possible from running off scared. Looking at the numbers and seeing how much money they threw at NXG it seems as if they think; well we need to cover that cost... What they should do is conclude that they need to seriously change (revert?) how they run their business (especially the LabVIEW development projects). The true cost of NXG will continue to rise by causing damage to their brand; unless they *simplify* ownership, *lower* the price, increase the work to recruit new (starting with students) and keep customers -AND invest the required amounts into developing a proper "NXG" (it is the foundation for the ecosystem that makes NI great, the cost of it has to be divided on the whole system, not just the SW itself). When that work is well on its way, and only then, they can think about subscriptions (the SSP solution is much more customer friendly though) and increased prices.
    6 points
  6. Two questions about this: 1. Does something like this already exist? 2. Is this something that could be useful? Every once in a while I need dynamic UI components that can be generated at runtime. One nice thing to use for this is a picture control; however it doesn't lend itself as well to keeping other pieces of function such as mouse click events and such. I put together a mini library of UI functions for this that has the ability to be extended. The UI can be generated dynamically at runtime and be any picture thing that you can draw. Using Standard layout techniques that you might find in other GUI libraries. The hierarchy generation can always be simplified by using some type of templating string. Example1.vi Front Panel on Pgui2.lvproj_My Computer _ 2021-07-02 14-03-54.mp4
    6 points
  7. Does it help to re-ask the question as "where should LabVIEW have a future?" It is not difficult to name a number of capabilities (some already stated here) that are extremely useful to anyone collecting or analyzing data that are either unique, or much simpler, using LabVIEW. They're often taken for granted and we forget how significant they are and how much power they unlock. For example (and others can add more): FPGA - much easier than any text-based FPGA programming, and so powerful to have deterministic computational access to the raw data stream Machine vision - especially combined with a card like the 1473R, though it's falling behind without CoaXPress Units - yes no-one uses them , but they can extend strict programming to validation of correct algorithm implementation Parallel and multi-threaded programming - is there any language as simple for constructing parallel code? Not to mention natural array computations Real-time programming Data-flow - a coherent way of treating data as the main object of interest, fundamental, yet a near-unique programming paradigm with many advantages and all integrated into a single programming environment where all the compilation and optimization is handled under the hood (with almost enough ability to tweak that) Unfortunately NI appear to be backing away from many of these strengths, and other features have been vastly overtaken (image processing has hardly been developed in the last 10 years, GUI design got sidetracked into NXG unfortunately). But the combination of low-level control in a very high-level language seems far too powerful and useful to have no future at all.
    6 points
  8. As if there were no such personalities on NI forums...
    5 points
  9. Found the issue. The cRIO and PC were connected via a router which was blocking the port used for firmware updates. NI MAX should display a message where the "Updated Firmware" button should be indicating that the port (with port number) is being blocked.
    5 points
  10. I don't have a use case for this but I love that the API uses plymorphic VI's-a vastly underused feature IMO. If you want to organise the functions instead of having a huge linear list, you can group them by separating the menu item with a colon ":".
    5 points
  11. Since Latin for six is "sex", we could have gone for "sexidecimal".
    5 points
  12. So I managed to find the underlying issue and at least one solution to it - sharing the information here. The Icon editor enumerates the font list in linux with command 'fc-list'. With OpenSUSE 43.2 / LV 2016 combo the fontlist looks like this: The listed fonts are essentially a list of the font files with full paths, and that does not work well with the font tool LV uses. If this list looks similar to yours and the fonts are not looking pretty, I have a solution for you - read on. To fix this a command 'fc-list : family' should be used instead, to come up with a list like this: There are two solutions (and I'm sure there are more) - you can decide which one to pursue depending on your expertise. As the Icon Editor in LV2016 (starting with LV2011 I think) is in packed library for execution optimizing purposes, the Icon Editor code can't directly be altered to fix this. One can come up with a solution where the command 'fc-list' is overridden in linux so it will always use the (proper for LabVIEW) format 'fc-list : family'. This may have some unwanted side effects if other programs use the command in similar fashion, so this may not be the best solution. It would be pretty easy to use for assessing whether this could be your problem also. There are multiple trivial ways of implementing this, so I won't be giving an exact solution - here is a list of them: https://lmgtfy.app/?q=override+command+in+linux Darren Nattinger has provided the source code for Enhanced Icon editor in https://forums.ni.com/t5/Enhanced-Icon-Editor/Icon-Editor-Source-Files-for-LabVIEW-2016/m-p/3538808 - You can replace the packed library LabVIEW uses as editor with this source. There are easy 3 step instructions on the site - even I managed to do that. Please give kudos to Darren should you go this way. When you have the shipped Icon Editor replaced with the source, you can directly edit the file in /usr/local/natinst/LabVIEW-2016/resource/plugins/NIIconEditor/Miscellaneous/Font/Linux.vi so it uses the correct form, like this:
    5 points
  13. I think you're more of a sidekick.
    4 points
  14. I get what you are saying, and agree with some of your comparisons. I've seen on the forums a few times when an inexperience LabVIEW developer is like "I know nothing about programming but was able to make a spectrum analyzer using Express VIs." And half the replies will be from people like me saying "You're doing it wrong" and they will replay with "Well yeah maybe, but it sure got the job done without much work." That's sorta how I feel here. Your criticism of Network Steams are valid. And better solutions can be made. I'm just glad that I was able to make a synchronous network transport mechanism that uses VIMs, has status, automatic reconnection, and can target applications running on different platforms and different operating systems. All of this with no networking experience, and the amount of effort needed to make this was pretty minimal. I forgot to update this thread, but I did present this to the user group here, and uploaded the package to VIPM.IO here.
    4 points
  15. LabVIEW, as the Xerox GUI, needs a Steve Jobs... I was an Apple fan back in the 20 MB HDD days. It was only natural to fall in love with LabVIEW as well.🤩
    4 points
  16. Hi Lavans I'm working on releasing our Medulla ViPER Dependency Injection Framework to the community as an open source project. ViPER has been a labor of love that I have been working on for close to 8 years. The motivation to develop ViPER was to reduce the cost, time and frustration involved in deploying test systems in highly regulated industries such as medical device manufacturing. The big problem that ViPER solves is that change does not require you to perform a full top to bottom verification of the system, only the new or changed component needs to be verified. We used ViPER at Cochlear to test implants and sound processors and is the standard architecture used within the enterprise. ViPER was also used to develop a system to parallel test up to 100 Trophon 2 units simultaneously for Nanosonics by implementing a Test Server running on an NI Industrial Controller. HMI Clients were implemented on tablets for operators, engineers and admins. Although ViPER is useful for test its not used just for test systems, you can build any system with ViPER. ViPER is a plugin architecture, it implements a recursive factory creator that injects pre-built (and verified) components into a system at runtime defined by a Object Definition Document. ViPER can build rich and deep object hierarchies, even inject into ancestors as well. Components include soft front panels and attribute and configuration viewer and are built on GDS4 class architecture. ViPER systems are also slim and efficient because they are not carrying around redundant classes in their builds that may or may not be needed. ViPER includes an Object Editor that allows you to create or edit the Object Definition Document but is also a useful engineering tool allowing you to navigate the object hierarchy, configure and launch Soft Front Panels for any sub objects. Included is a Project template that allows you to create your own ViPER Components. I presented ViPER the GLA Summit last year and to the Sydney LabVIEW User Group, I've posted the Video of the presentation on LinkedIn, I'm keen to find a few gurus to have play with it before I release it. ViPER: A Dependency Injection Framework for LabVIEW Cheers Kurt
    4 points
  17. View File BlueSerialization Serialize and deserialize LabVIEW classes using either JSONtext or TOML Official documentation: https://github.com/justiceb/BlueSerialization Submitter bjustice Submitted 08/05/2021 Category General LabVIEW Version 2018 License Type BSD (Most common)  
    4 points
  18. Nice! While you are there please convince Elon to buy NI and turn it back into an engineering company 🤣
    3 points
  19. LabVIEW never has been a money maker for NI directly. They were able to develop LabVIEW because of what they earned with their hardware sales. And LabVIEW was used to drive those hardware sales. A very successful model that drove others like HP Vee and such out of the market in the not very long term. Maybe HP/Agilent also was simply already to big for that market segment that they could possibly target with a product like this. The entire T&M component market isn't that huge. For HP it was what they had been starting with, but the big money was earned (and sometimes biggly lost) already in other areas. T&M was good for a steady revenue, but nothing that would stand out on the yearly shareholders report. It was unsexy for non-technicals and rather boring. That was one of the big reasons to separate HP into multiple companies. An attempt to create smaller entities that target a specific market segment and could be fine tuned in the sales and marketing efforts to the needs of that market. About 10 years ago NI reached the size where they started to feel the limitations of the T&M component market themselves. There simply was not a big enough market left that they could capture, to continue their standard double digits yearly sales grow for much longer. Some analysts were hired to look into this and their recommendations were pretty clear. Don't try to be the wholesale everything for all little parts manufacturer in T&M, but concentrate on specific areas where big corporations with huge production lines invest their test and measurement money. Their choice fell on semiconductor testing and more recently the EV market. It has a huge potential and rather than selling ten-thousends of DAQ boxes to hundreds of integrators, they now sell and deliver hundreds of fully assembled turnkey testers to those corporate users and earn with each of them more than they could ever earn with several 1000 DAQ boxes. What used to be NI's core business is nowadays a side line, at best a means to deliver some parts for those testers. But more and more a burden that costs a lot of money in comparison to the revenue it could even under ideal conditions generate. If you can understand this you also can guess where NI is heading. They won't die and their shares will likely not falter. But what they will be has little to do with what they used to be. If LabVIEW still has a place in this I do not know. Personally I think it would be better if it was under the parapluie of a completely separate entity than the new NI but I also have my doubts that that would have long term surviving chances. Earning enough money with a development environments itself is a feat that almost nobody has successfully managed for a longer period. But the sometimes heard request to Open Source LabVIEW has also not a lot of chances. It would likely cause a few people to take a peek at it and then quickly loose interest, since its code base is simply to complex. And there is also the problem that the current LabVIEW source code never could be open sourced as is. There are so many patent encumbered parts in it and 3rd party license dependencies, that nobody would be legally allowed to distribute even a single build of it without first hiring an entire law firm to settle those issues. While NI owns the rights for them or acquired a license to use them, many of these licenses do not give NI the right to simply let others use them as they wish. So open sourcing LabVIEW would be a fairly big investment in time and effort before it could be done. And who is willing to foot that bill?
    3 points
  20. I don't know much about CINs, CLN, or DLL calling in LabVIEW. But don't be discouraged. Our history makes us what we are. There's several projects I started and spent a lot of time on just to do nothing with, but I feel like I learned stuff or grew as a developer and a person just because of the journey. Maybe that time could be better spent elsewhere. But with that mentality I'd never do anything for entertainment.
    3 points
  21. As daddreamer pointed out, quite a bit of those functions are actually documented and always have been. The first multiplatform version of LabVIEW shipped with about 15 cm of printed manuals and reached at its top probably 25 cm. One of the many manuals was called the Code Interface Reference Manual. And while the name might have seemed to only be useful in Code Interface Nodes, those functions were always also available in shared libraries too since LabVIEW added official support for calling them. The information in that manual is for most of it also contained in daddreamers link, without the CIN specifics, which are nowadays useless and really have no advantage to shared libraries since about LabVIEW 7.1 but many disadvantages (and the 64-bit versions of LabVIEW do not support them anymore. Yes I'm aware that someone tried to hack them anyways into LabVIEW 64-bit and was partially successful. But it's an exercise in vain as it really has no advantages whatsoever to shared libraries). This is the Code Interface Reference Manual from around LabVIEW 3.1 (Release September 1994). It is 16mm thick and there were about 6 or 7 other manuals like that, some of them more than double as thick than this one. Lot's and lots of trees being cut down for all those LabVIEW manuals! It's for the most part the same as is also in daddreamers link, but there the CIN part is removed and few extra functions are documented that were added since then Some of the undocumented functions could be useful sometimes but being undocumented, it is a bit of a problem as they could change at anytime or completely disappear, which has happened to many of them over the course of LabVIEW development. Some were exported in the past for the compiler to be able to create code to access them directly but are useless to be called from your own external code as you lack access to internal data that needs to be passed to those functions to be useful. Some are still there as a placeholder but simply return a notImplemented error as they were moved to other parts of LabVIEW and only the export remained to make external code that depended on them in the past not load up broken but instead return a runtime error. CINs that didn't load really could throw LabVIEW into a fit. There are various additional managers to the documented Memory, File and Support manager functions in that manual but most are not really helpful. Things I have experimented with in that past and I would have liked to have more official access too, were the MagicCookie handler (all LabVIEW refnums are under the hood MagicCookies), UserDataSession (a more functional wrapper around MagicCookies), (which with the help of something called ObjectManager allows to add special crafted shared libraries through a descriptive text file, directly into the LabVIEW refnum system and access the shared library functions through property and method nodes), Thread, Mutex and Event manager (which basically offers a common interface to the underlying platform threads, mutexes and events), and it even has a Window manager, which abstracts the underlying OS windows into its own window API. But that Window manager is for modern requirements with multi monitor virtual desktops a bit arcane and one of the reasons that LabVIEW isn't that great on such setups. But it is very involved and hairy in some parts to make the various windowing systems such as Mac Quickdraw, Mac Cocoa, Windows GDI and Unix XWindows all map into the same common API. That makes any attempt to change something on one platform a really taunting exercise as it has a great chance to break one of the other platforms. There are also things like a Text manager (a VERY arcane attempt to abstract fonts and text handling into a set of functions), a Dialog manager, which allows to create dialogs in C code that use a LabVIEW VI front panel as resource for the user facing GUI but the entire handling is done in a compiled function from C(++). A Resource manager handles all the binary file formats in LabVIEW that are very much modeled around the old Macintosh resource file format. These are all things that were mostly present in LabVIEW 3 or 4 already, with the exception of the Thread, Mutex and Event manager, which was added in LabVIEW 5 when LabVIEW got true OS supported multithreading, and the UserDataRefnums which were around LabVIEW 7. I have very little knowledge about the interna of things that were added after around LabVIEW 7.1, as that was when I stopped to really dig into the LabVIEW internals. There is an extensive LVVariant interface that gets also exported since around LabVIEW 8.0 and which would allow to also work with Variants in external code, if it was documented. There was some header file downloadable in the past as part of the CUDA toolkit that contained some of these declarations and with it it would be possible to do some experimentation, but without real documentation it is rather cumbersome. Now before you start and scream that NI has kept all these nice cookies from you, consider that most users even struggle with the documented functions already and that are the more simple APIs. Much of what I described above would require several centimeters of printed manuals for each of them! It would also mean that these APIs are absolutely carved in stone and never ever can be changed again, which is something NI has kept to in all this time, unless there was an obvious bug in one of the documented functions. The undocumented functions allowed a much more lenient handling when something needed to be changed. The only people going to scream and show up with a rocket launcher because something broke, were either NI internal people or someone bold enough to hack around undocumented functions, where the LabVIEW developers simply could say: Bad luck! You were not supposed to play with those rusty nails!
    3 points
  22. I have been a community admin for another Stack Exchange site, and the difference in tone between the various sites astounds me. I didn't understand how much rides on the tone the admins take. Stack Overflow, the main Exchange, is really bad to the point that I have shadow accounts to ask questions there because once you ask what is seen by some as a dumb question, they follow you to your next question with "you're still an idiot" type comments. It's massively helpful when it is helpful and deeply insulting when it is not. But it doesn't have to be that way -- it's the choice of the admins for that particular Exchange site. There's a difference between one or two obnoxious persons shining a flashlight in your eyes versus a group of people with laser pointers and magnesium flares. In my experience, Stack Overflow is the latter form of hell.
    3 points
  23. Antoine's new profile pic is enough to scare anyone off of the forums-including search engines. He's really let himself go.
    3 points
  24. Thank goodness I've finally got that promotion. Y'all were holding out on this until I went back to writing C++ code for you, I assume. ;-)
    3 points
  25. Here are a bunch of other web resources for colors & UI Design: Data Visualization Since LabVIEW tends to get used a lot in industrial, scientific, and academic settings, it's pretty common that we need to display data in a clear & understandable way. There are a bunch of resources for picking color schemes to represent data to improve contrast, readability, and accessibility (such as colorblind safe palette). Color Brewer: A useful website with a variety of color schemes for displaying data. Has options for sequential datasets, diverging, and qualitative. As well, it shows whether the selected color set is colorblind friendly, print friendly, or photocopy friendly. matplotlib colourmaps: Technically a python resource, but colors are colors. matplotlib is one of the most widely used python libraries for data visualization in python, and they've put a ton of effort into designing good color schemes. There's another library called seaborn that is based on matplotlib that has some more color palettes. Tristen's HCL Picker: A color palette picker which lets you choose colors that are evenly spaced in hue, chroma, or in lightness. This tool is really useful for generating palettes with good contrast. Fundamentals of Data Visualization: A book with lots of useful information on data visualization, from colors to plot styles and more. Design Palettes Making data readable isn't the only thing that matters, sometimes you want to have pretty UIs too. Some handy resources are: Adobe Color Tools: Has a color wheel for designing your own palettes. A tool to extract color themes & gradients from an image (drag/drop a clients logo in there to get a palette based on their company colors), and a tool for checking color contrast for readability. coolors.co: A website with a ton of color palettes to pick from. Material Design Color System: Material Design is primarily meant for mobile & web apps, but the design principles can apply to any application really. The Material Design guidelines have good tips on making intuitive UIs, and provides a palette of nice looking colors. Material Design Palette: To go along with the above. Select your primary & accent colors, and this website returns a palette. colormind.io: A neat website that procedurally generates color palettes. Lock in one or two colors and let the website pick the rest of the palette. mycolor.space: Similar to colormind.io, this auto-generates a palette. ColorSpace takes in a single color and returns several matching palettes. Icons Lastly, good icons can be a great finishing touch. Maybe it's just because I've been using LabVIEW for so long, but I find LabVIEWs icons to be a bit dated. Material Design Icons: A website with a ton of free icons, able to be downloaded as pngs. Adds a nice touch to UI elements. FontAwesome: Has about 1700 free icons. With a subscription, has almost 15k. icons8: Has something like 875,000 icons. Free to use as long as you credit & link to icons8 in an 'About' page.
    3 points
  26. Noting down this mainly for self reference since it occurred to me time and again, in case it helps others too. I have several recent versions of LV installed on Ubuntu 20.04 (with alien). The nice thing is that somehow a NI deb package stream became known to the system, and some package upgrades are found automatically. However there is one caveat: each time the kernel is upgraded, several NI dkms kernel modules need to be recompiled. Usually that is automatically done, but sometimes stumbles on a missing config/modversions.h file. It seems that not every kernel headers package includes it. Missing that, LV crashes as soon as anything needing one such modules is loaded. E.g., as an easy test occurrence, when putting a new VISA control on an empty FP. The solution is trivial: if the (usually empty) file is missing, create it with sudo touch /usr/src/linux-headers-XX.YY.ZZ-generic/include/config/modversions.h where XX.YY.ZZ is the kernel du jour version (e.g. 5.13.0-28 as of today). sudo apt reinstall ni-kal and a reboot then fix the crash.
    3 points
  27. It's not directed at us (engineers). It's a sales pitch to internal profit centers with the hope that external LabVIEW engineers will use the arguments to their upper management. In essence it is "this is good for both of us, but mainly us, and means we will listen more, maybe". You will notice there are no concrete or tangible benefits to anyone other than NI. However I don't think this brain-wave coming directly after NXG being killed is coincidence. What is clear is that their mind is made up and now it's just a case of managing the PR. "The beatings will continue until morale improves" - Captain Bligh in Mutiny on the Bounty
    3 points
  28. I skirted the edge of what I'm allowed to say in my last statement. I'm obviously not at liberty to share any numbers, nor can I speak officially for NI on that front, but I personally had no qualms about returning to the LV team based on the data I've seen, at least for now. The future is not as bright as I'd like, but it's good enough for me to keep working. The decline on LAVA is worrisome. I've also noticed the reduction. It might be indicative that all of our new user growth is in experienced groups buying more seats for legacy systems without onboarding more new hires. I worry about that. But there's several other factors that could explain it also: The annual refresh of users from NIWeek/NIConnect has not happened for two years. The forums on ni.com are significantly improved (not as nice as LAVA in my opinion, but good enough to not drive people away like they used to). User groups went virtual during pandemic, which means there are now many more places to go for expert input regardless of geography. The number of other support venues has blossomed -- Stack Overflow is now available to LV in a way that it wasn't just a couple years ago; internal support groups exist at far more large companies than in the past. And the LV population has diversified into non-English countries. So am I worried about the future? Yes. But do I think we are currently in a bad spot? No.
    3 points
  29. Unfortunately I do think there is a strategy behind this. In the past NI was a company centered around hardware sales in the form of computer plugin cards. The fact that they were a lot better in providing good and well designed supporting software for that hardware was for years a distinguishing factor that made them grow while the competition had a hard catch up game to do and eventually all more or less faltered. The software in itself never really was the money maker, much of it even was given away free with the hardware and was considered a supporting expenditure that was financed with part of the profit for the hardware. When they had pretty much the whole market of what they possibly could get, they run into the problem that there was very little grow in this market anymore for them. So they set out to find new markets and moved towards turn key semiconductor testers that they could sell a dozen a time to the big semiconductor manufacturers for big money. Suddenly those pesky DAQ cards and DAQ boxes were just a margin anymore and they were at best a supporting technology, but the accompanying software was getting more an more a costly burden rather than a supporting technology. Nowadays there isn't one NI marketing but each division has pretty much its own marketing department and is also its independent profit center. And then an independent software/LabVIEW division suddenly shows mainly as a post in the cost category that doesn't bring in as much as it costs. So they try to increase the income but I think they missed that train already 15 years ago when they were refusing to consider other venues for LabVIEW. Nowadays the LabVIEW community is a marginalized small group of enthusiast who are looked at by the rest of the industry as a bunch of crazies who can't let go of their pet IDE and the rest of the world has moved on to Python and .Net and will move on to another hype in a few years. And the higher NI management is likely aware of that. While I do believe that the LabVIEW developers and the managers who directly work there really would like to make LabVIEW a good and flourishing product, I feel the higher management has already decided that this is going to be a dead end and have very little intentions to do anything else than let it bleed to death, so they can get rid of that liability.
    3 points
  30. I can amortize 20,000$ one time license costs, I can't amortize 500$/ month subscription. Python seems more attractive every day.
    3 points
  31. We have noticed in the last few years that the outstanding support from NI technical support quickly detorated to the level of standard untrained technical support that call centers located in some low income countries often provide. However I have to say that this trend seems to have been reversed in recent times. I had three technical support questions in the course of about one year now, non was standard and included things that were simply not possible because the feature was officially not present. The support people were very helpful in trying to find workarounds and in two cases provided even solutions that were based on information that was gained directly from the product owners and developers to access the feature through direct behind the scene configuration files and APIs. In both cases with the strong warning that this was not the officially sanctioned way to do things and that there was a real chance that it may break in future versions, but that it was at the moment the best that could be done.
    3 points
  32. Try: apt install xfonts-75dpi xfonts-100dpi Then reboot.
    3 points
  33. "The software you are refactoring had one and it is too costly to change the training materials". How's that? It is likely that a great deal of pressure had to be applied to even allow a rewrite and the manager probably had a hard time arguing for a budget to do it. Getting hot under the collar over a button isn't a hill I would die on. I would concentrate of making my life easier supporting it going forward than what it looked like-which was decided a long time ago.
    3 points
  34. Shameless plug but feedback would be great since there's a lot that's changed. A few more eyes on it would help immensely before going live. The Encryption Compendium for LabVIEW (ECL) has had a major update. It's completed and a couple of weeks away from release as the documentation is in progress so there may be a few errors on that front. It's a commercial package so the gibs free crowd will, I hope, be disappointed. So what's new? IPv6 support (Thanks Rolf for your help with that). I've been wanting this for sooooo long but it required moving away from the NI primitives and nasty text programming. I bit the bullet and now have it, although a lot less hair SFTP Since NI released their poultry offering I thought I'd productionise the SFTP I had in my back pocket for quite a while and offer something actually useful. It comes with a full client example and supports recursive uploads, downloads and deletions (be careful with that last one). It also uses events for progress and status feedback in a similar fashion to the Websockets below. The event topology will be come a common feature of protocols in future additions. Websockets The ECL is a better home than a separate product since it was very difficult to distribute when trying to support TLS. Reworked from the ground, up it sits nicely in ECL and is the start of more encrypted protocol support in the future. Oh yes. Almost forgot. The ability to use Windows Certificate Store because ... why not? (and I wish I had thought of it ) If anyone would like to play before its release proper in a couple of weeks time, I can give you a trial copy (valid for 30 days). PM me and I'll send you a link.
    3 points
  35. I can say without any doubt that online clothing stuff is good quality or not.
    3 points
  36. I like resizable UIs, and that often means custom code to handle some of the operations in the UI. One such feature I like is a vertical array, that shows more rows, as the window size gets larger and can show more. I've used code like this a few times and figured the community might like it too. When doing this there are times when I want a user to be able to add more rows, and some times that it needs to either be static, or set by some other outside variable. So in this demo is also a way to link a vertical scrollbar that is a separate control, and have it move, and get set, so that it looks like it is linked to the array control. But this will coerce, and not allow more rows to be seen, than the number of elements in the array. At the moment this only supports 1D arrays, and only in the vertical direction. Code is saved in 2020. Array Resize and Scrollbar Link.zip
    3 points
  37. Another option... Use a third party installer. InnoSetup works really well.
    3 points
  38. Or even better: Replace "Write To Text file"/"Read From Text File" with "Write To Binary File"/"Read From Binary File". The output of "Flatten to String" is not text. (String != Text)
    3 points
  39. Right-Click on the "Read From Text File" method and unselect "Convert EOL". The number "13" (0xD or Carriage Return) gives it away. If you look at the HEX representation of what you save and what you read from file, you'll notice the 0xD gets converted to 0xA unless you uncheck that box. Tip: If you deal exclusively with HEX/binary data, you might want to save it using byte arrays instead. The result will be the same in your file, but you won't get bitten by hidden config parameters in your node...
    3 points
  40. LabVIEW Software Engineers, here's your opportunity to work with us at SpaceX! I'm hiring for a Sr. Software Engineer on the Ground Software team. We build control and monitoring systems running the Falcon launchpads, mission systems launching astronauts to the International Space Station onboard Dragon, and a fleet of sea-faring recovery vessels bringing spacecraft and rockets back to shore. The screens you see in Mission Control are the UIs we build. Read more about the role and apply here: https://boards.greenhouse.io/spacex/jobs/5480997002?gh_jid=5480997002
    3 points
  41. There are many links on the Internet to tell you how to configure git to use custom tools for VI. Many are wrong. Yesterday, I and another developer outside NI worked through the sequence and got it working repeatably on both of our machines. Here is the process. Save both of the attached files someplace permanent on your hard drive that is outside of any particular git repo. We used C:\Users\<<username>>\AppData\Local\Programs\GIT\bin _LVCompareWrapper.sh_LVMergeWrapper.sh Modify your global git config file. It is saved at C:\Users\<<username>>\.gitconfig You need to add the following lines: [mergetool "sourcetree"] cmd = 'C:/Users/smercer/AppData/Local/Programs/GIT/bin/_LVMergeWrapper.sh' \"$BASE\" \"$LOCAL\" \"$REMOTE\" \"$MERGED\" trustExitCode = true [difftool "sourcetree"] cmd = 'C:/Users/smercer/AppData/Local/Programs/GIT/bin/_LVCompareWrapper.sh' \"$REMOTE\" \"$LOCAL\" [merge] tool = sourcetree [diff] tool = sourcetree That's it. There are lots of ways to edit the .gitconfig from the command line or by using SourceTree's UI... if you know those ways, go ahead and use them.
    3 points
  42. Yes, I don't assume you use many new features of LabVIEW from the last 10 years if you still develop in LabVIEW 2009.
    3 points
  43. NI didn't say they would be porting NXG features to 2021, but to future versions of LabVIEW. Technically such a promise would have been unfulfillable, since at the time the NXG demise was announced, LabVIEW 2021 was basically in a state where anything that was to be included in 2021 had to be more or less fully finished and tested. A release of a product like LabVIEW is not like your typical LabVIEW project where you might make last minute changes to the program while testing your application at the customer side. For a software package like LabVIEW, there is a complete code freeze except for breaking bug fixes, then there is a testing, packaging and testing again cycle for the Beta Release, which typically takes a month or two alone, then the Beta phase of about 3 to 4 months and finally the release. So about 6 months before the projected release date, anything that is not considered ready for prime time is simply not included in the product, or sometimes hidden behind an undocumented ini file setting. Considering that, the expectation to see any significant NXG features in LabVIEW 2021 was simply blue eyed and irrational. I agree with you that LabVIEW is a unique programming environment that has some features that are simply unmatched by anything else. And there are areas where its age is clearly showing such as lack of proper Unicode support, and related to that the lack of support for long path names. Personally I feel like I could tackle the lower level part of full Unicode support in LabVIEW including full Unicode path support quite easily if I was part of the development team, but have to admit that the higher level integration into front panels and various interfaces is a very daunting task that I have no idea how I would solve it. Still, reworking the lower level string and path management in LabVIEW to fully support Unicode would be a first and fundamental step to allow the other task of making this available to the UI in a later stage. This low level manager can exist in LabVIEW even if the UI and higher level parts don't yet make use of it. The opposite is not possible. That is just one of many things that need some serious investment to make the whole LabVIEW platform again viable for further development into the future. This example also shows that some of the work needed to port NXG features back to LabVIEW require first some significant effort that will not immediately be visible in a new LabVIEW version. While such a change as described above is definitely possible to do within a few months, the whole task of making whole LabVIEW fully Unicode capable without breaking fundamental backwards compatibility, is definitely something that will take more than one LabVIEW version to eventually fully materialize. There are a few lower hanging fruits that can help prepare for that and should have been done years ago already but were discarded as "being already fixed in NXG" but the full functionality just for full Unicode support in LabVIEW is going to be a herculean task to pull off, without going the path of NXG to reinvent LabVIEW from scratch (which eventually proved to be an unreachable feat). My personal feelings about the future of LabVIEW are mixed. Not so much because LabVIEW couldn't have a future but because of the path NI as a company is heading. They have been changing over the last few years considerably, from an engineering driven to a management driven company. While in the past, engineers had some real say in what NI was going to do, nowadays it's mostly managers who see Excel charts, sale numbers and the stock market exchange as the main decision making thing for NI. Anything else has to be subordinated to the bigger picture of a guaranteed minimum yearly growth percentage and stock price. The traditional Test & Measurement market NI has served for much of its existence is not able to support those growth numbers anymore. So they are making heavy inroads into different markets and seem to consider the traditional T&M market by now just as a legacy rather than a significant contributor to their bottom line.
    3 points
  44. I did not know. That possibility was not even on my radar. Even though the drumbeat of bad news had been going for a while, most corporations refuse to change direction on a bad decision. NI showed more sentience than I usually expect from massed humans: the sunk cost fallacy is a trap that is very hard to get out of. I figured the very good engineers on NXG would either surge through it and make it fly or we would bankrupt the company trying. That's the pattern established by plenty of other companies. Mixed. I spent 4.5 years directly working on NXG (2011 to 2016) and countless hours in later years working with the NXG team to design a future G. I really wanted it to fly. There is so much good in that IDE, including some amazing things that I just don't see how we ever do in the LabVIEW codebase without just shattering compatibility. But at the same time, I was watching good friends toil on something that the market just wasn't adopting. The software had some problems that were going to take a long time to solve. The issues were all solvable, but the time needed to fix them... that was harder and harder to justify. NXG gave us a GREAT platform for other software: Veristand, FlexLogger, etc. That code is extremely modular and can be repurposed for all sorts of tools. We also learned a heck of a lot by building NXG -- some things that I thought we could never do in LabVIEW now seem possible. NXG gave us a sandbox to learn a whole lot about modern software engineering without putting the delivery schedule for mature software at risk, and those practices [have been|are being] brought back and applied to LabVIEW -- that will decrease cost of maintaining older code. All in all, NXG was valuable -- the expenditure was not a complete loss. I am very sorry to the few customers who did migrate to NXG. We don't have a reverse migration tool, and building one would be absurdly expensive. Leaving those folks stranded is going to hurt -- I hate letting our customers down and just saying, "We have no solution to help you." There aren't many of those folks (that's essentially the problem), but they do exist, and they are basically stuck having to rewrite their NXG apps in some other tool. I can only hope that they pick LabVIEW. I don't know if this will help us or hurt us with customers in the future... on one hand, people may say, "Well, you let us down on NXG, why should we trust you will be there for us on any new products?" On the other hand, this decision was clearly made listening to customer feedback, and it takes a lot of humility to swallow a loss that big, which may make customers trust our judgement more in the future. And, really, there's nothing to compare with the scale of NXG -- an entire computing platform -- so this does seem like something that needs to be judged in isolation. I really like programming in G. I like being able to expand G to make it more powerful. I wanted NXG to succeed because it had the potential to be a better G. It failed. Its failure means more resources for the existing LabVIEW platform, which will directly help our customers in the short run. It leaves open some big questions for the long run. So, in summary: I think it was a decision that had to be made, and I'm happy to work for a company that can learn from new data, then admit a mistake, and then figure out how to correct it.
    3 points
  45. The SQLite API for LabVIEW had a feature for that. Very easy with a database. I suppose you could do something similar just by saving and loading a particularly named JSON file.
    2 points
  46. Thank you for posting this. It's very helpful and informative. I was noticing icon font issues in LabVIEW 2020 Community Edition for Linux, so it doesn't look like NI has fixed (or knew about) the issue in LV 2020 for Linux either.
    2 points
  47. I came across this topic whilst trying to figure out the text width for UTF-16 strings - the solution we used was to write the text/font to the caption of a string control with 'size to text' enabled and then read the Caption.Area Width property: I think the only issue is that LabVIEW adds a few pixels of spacing around the caption - but I think this will be a constant that can be removed.
    2 points
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