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I often have to create interfaces for power supplies. I often use the QMH for my overall architecture.

 

I have created a QMH that controls multiple power supplies. It was designed in such a way that it takes a minute to add an additional power supply. Of course I am using Dynamic Dispatch to use multiple types of power supplies. It works quite well.

 

I am trying to get better at LVOOP and plug-ins. I was thinking of creating an abstract class that contains a QMH for just one power supply. Of course I would create children for several types of power supplies. My plan with the single QMH for each power supply would be to use it as a plug-in or use a sub panel so that all the QMHs are on one UI.

 

If anyone has any advice on the methodology please feel free to comment. Also I am new to LAVA so I hope I am not asking something that has already been solved.

 

 

Edited by RedAndGreen

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Using a number of interaction queued message handlers (QMH) is quite a common architecture (sometimes known as “actor-oriented design").  There are multiple packages in the community that people have made available**, and I believe quite a few people have their own private implementations.   Personally, I usually have a separate QMH for each independent bit of hardware.   I have sometimes done an LVOOP driver (with child types) inside a QMH, which I think is what you are describing.

 

 

** Mine is Messenger Library (an introductory video); there is also the Actor Framework (part of LabVIEW), Delacor DQMH, and Aloha, just to name a few that are available on the LabVIEW Tools Network, and you’ll find a few other examples on LAVA such as Message Pump.

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drjdpowell,

 

Thanks for the feedback. Boy do I have a lot to learn.

 

I know how to do inheritance and dynamic dispatch but I don't know much about design patterns and frameworks.

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Hi there,

This may be a little late but I wrote a blog post regarding the use of a HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) inside a QMH. OK, it's our own flavour of QMH which we call the DQMH but the post content is still valid for your use case. In addition the example I use is based around a Power Supply;

Here's the link 

http://www.walkingthewires.com/2015/10/21/hal-in-your-dqmh-2/

Hope it's useful

Chris

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